We Tried Trader Joe's Best-Selling Bottles Of Rosé — & Here's Our Favorite

Photographed by Ali Gavillet.
Lovers of wine and budget prices are probably already fans of Trader Joe's legendary bottle lineup. The cult-favorite grocery store tackles more than just cheap seasonal food trends, it also dives head first into affordable beverage territory. And, despite our best efforts to branch out to alternative summer booze options this summer, we still find ourselves overcome by a certain pink-hued bottle's gravitational pull when stocking up for park picnics or rooftop hangs. Especially at TJ's, where the rosé selection spans from bottles as cheap as $3.99 to "fancier" finds (still cheap AF) that clock in at $9.99 — making it a feasible and affordable reality to actually drink summer's sweet nectar, as they say, all-day.
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With its expansive, well-priced collection, choosing a quality bottle with no prior purchasing knowledge can be overwhelming. Thankfully, Trader Joe's offers a "Best-Sellers" section in-store to guide helpless customers. So, we scoped out and scooped up all of the best-selling rosés available in this designated area for a definitive taste test.
Ahead we rank all six bottles, each with varying price points and flavor profiles, from worst to best. Scroll on to find out which budget bottle of Trader Joe's rosé you should buy in bulk — and which is best left in the bargain bin alongside the "Two Buck Chuck."
1 of 6
Cherry Blossom Rosé (Our Least Favorite)

Price (Cheapest)
$4.99

Tasting Notes
It had a heavy almost syrup-like mouthfeel with an overly sweet and fermented juice flavor — so, not great.

Final Thoughts
Although the lovely label coupled with an affordable price tag was promising, this rosé ended up ranking dead last among all of our taste testers. If you're a rosé drinker who prefers overly sweet, funky, and fermented Juicy Juice wine, then go nuts with this cheap bottle.
2 of 6
Les Portes De Bordeaux Rosé

Price
$6.99

Tasting Notes
A lighter mouthfeel than the first, one taster likened this rosé to "acid water," while the more temperate tasters described the ill-favored pour as bland with floral overtones. It's perfume-y with a sour vinegar-like aftertaste.

Final Thoughts
Another fancy-looking, French-labeled bottle that was yet another rosé herring for our tasting team.
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3 of 6
Emma Reichart Pinot Noir Rosé

Price
$4.99

Tasting Notes
A medium, slightly buttery mouthfeel with a more complex acidic flavor that made our tasters mouths' pucker and had a slight effervescence.

Final Thoughts
This rosé wasn't a winner, but for the price and the pretty packaging it certainly wasn't a complete loser either. We'd pick up a few bottles in a pinch to fuel a summer party (where the guests' wine-tasting chops weren't a concern).
4 of 6
La Ferme Julien Rosé

Price
$5.99

Tasting Notes
A very light mouthfeel and a refreshingly smooth flavor that didn't skew towards the sides of too floral or fruity.

Final Thoughts
This rosé was not a home-run favorite among our tasters (it lacked any interesting flavor complexity), but it tasted like the most dependable purchase of the bunch — it was a smooth and drinkable option that we'd rely on for an affordable crowdpleaser at summer cookouts.
5 of 6
Mulderbosch Cab Rosé (Close Runner-Up)

Price
$7.99

Tasting Notes
Not too acidic, this bottle had a medium to light mouthfeel and complex flavor: stone fruits coupled with refreshing minerality.

Final Thoughts
While not for the average easy-drinking palate, this unique rosé would make a great under $10 purchase for surprising your crowd with something a little more complex this summer.
6 of 6
Bodega Piedra Negra Rosado (The Winner)

Price (Most Expensive)
$9.99

Tasting Notes
By far the lightest and crispest mouthfeel, this bottle had a subtle fruit-forward sweetness and a tart acidic aftertaste.

Final Thoughts
Go figure, the most expensive bottle won. Even so, at $9.99 a pop, this rosé was refreshing and easy to sip with a luxurious flavor pay-off that we'd expect from a bottle double the price.

*Hot Tip: If you don't feel like shelling out $50 on 5 bottles for your next summer soiree, then try buying a few bottles on this list for a less expensive total. Then, mix them all together with fresh berries, sparkling water, and some citrus juice and serve the concoction over ice as a homemade sangria — we promise that the hi-low combination makes for one tasty sip.
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