5 Times Feminism Won Tumblr In 2014

The F-word had a massive 2014 — the F-word in this case being feminism. TIME magazine tried to ban it. Beyoncé performed in front of it in neon lights at the VMAs. Every single celebrity was asked if she or he considered her/himself a feminist, and then that answer was dissected at length. Roxane Gay taught us how to be bad feminists. We looked at Disney Princesses as feminist role models. Emma Watson launched HeForShe at the U.N. and male celebrities quickly got on board.
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The case for feminism's banner year goes on and on, but it was most evident in one location: Tumblr. The microblogging platform provided a place where GIFs, memes, and other moments of female empowerment could be celebrated and shared. As we look back at the year that was, here are five ways that feminism found its way to the top of Tumblr.
Beyoncé joined the campaign to ban the word bossy.
In light of the viral catcalling video — and all the imitations and criticism it wrought — this interaction shared on Tumblr instead focuses on ways to foster gender-neutral interactions free of objectification.
This is what it would look like if tabloid headlines were stripped of sexism. "Flaunting her curves" simply becomes "famous person exists outside."
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