How To Make Consent Sexy, According To A Dominatrix

When Mistress Velvet, a BDSM dominatrix in Chicago, spanks a client, she demands that they tell her how much it hurts on a scale from 1 to 10. "I have to be careful and not just ask them, 'Do you like this?' Because I need them to feel submissive to me," she says. That means she's continually asking clients for their consent to hit them and tie them up, which can be tricky when the whole point is that they feel submissive to her. "When I ask for a scale, I'm gauging where they're at so I know how to play with them next time.”
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Mistress Velvet calls covert questions of this sort “consent training,” because even though people seek her out to dominate them in a sexual manner, getting consent from her clients is paramount to everything that she does. People who don’t engage in BDSM may assume that consent isn’t a huge part of bondage and masochism. How much can you really care about what a person feels if you’re intentionally causing them pain, the thinking may go. But purposely inflicting pain is a delicate task, especially when struggles, shouts, yelps, and begging someone to stop are all part of the experience. That’s why dommes and their submissives establish safe words before a BDSM scene even gets started, and why consent is so vital to the work Mistress Velvet does. It ensures that both she and her clients have a safe and satisfying experience. The argument that asking for consent “ruins the mood” is infuriating to her. There’s never a reason to risk someone's bodily autonomy, she says, and it's 100% possible to ask for consent while keeping the sexy mood alive — in fact consent can heighten the erotic energy in both BDSM and non-BDSM exchanges in ways you might not expect.

Just because someone let you put your hands up their shirt, doesn't mean that they want you to put your hands down their pants.

Mistress Velvet, BDSM Dominatrix
In both Mistress Velvet’s work and personal life, she’s a huge proponent of affirmative consent, the idea that you should be asking for a verbal "yes" at every step (from kissing to caressing to penetration) of intimate and sexual encounters. "Just because someone let you put your hands up their shirt, doesn't mean that they want you to put your hands down their pants," she tells Refinery29. "Just because my client is okay with me spanking them in some ways doesn't mean they're okay with me spanking them in other ways."
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Similar to sex, consent should be fun, even if you’re not into BDSM. Asking someone, “Can I kiss you?” isn’t a mood killer, it’s an important step for intimacy to continue in a way that confirms everyone is on the same page, comfortable, and safe. You can also get creative with how you say it by lowering your voice or throwing some sexy eyes your partner’s way. As long as you remain clear and give the person you’re being intimate with the space to object or say “no,” asking for consent shouldn’t be much different from other communication during intimacy.
You can use the same kind of language throughout a sexual experience — saying things such as, "I'm going to rip your clothes off now, okay?" or "What do you want me to do to you?" — so you don't have to stop having sex in order to obtain ongoing consent.
"If I was having sex with someone for the first time, I wouldn't want them to assume that I like to be choked," Mistress Velvet says. "But there's a way to ask when they're pounding me and they're like, 'Do you like to be choked? And then I can be like, 'Yes, choke me daddy.'" The same scenario works in the reverse if you want to offer consent. So, if you like to be choked, but aren't sure that your partner will ask, then you can say, "Can you choke me?" during sex. Asking for what you want — whether it’s choking, oral, or a simple ass grab — won't ruin the moment, it’ll make things even more steamy.
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If I was having sex with someone for the first time, I wouldn't want them to assume that I like to be choked.

Mistress Velvet, BDSM Dominatrix
Of course, you might feel as if you’re being thrown out of your sexy headspace at first if you or your partner aren’t accustomed to asking questions before, during and after sex. But practice makes perfect, and eventually you’ll not only get used to it, but also come to appreciate the benefits of getting exactly what you want, and being able to give someone else exactly what they want.
Mistress Velvet says that she struggled to make consent sexy at first, too. "Definitely at times [in my vanilla sex life], people would say, 'Why are you asking me so many questions?' and it would sometimes pause things," she says. In those moments, she would explain that she has a history of sexual trauma, and so it's important to her that her needs are being heard.
Maybe there's no trauma in your past, but it's still important to ask for and give consent regardless of your sexual history. When you're first starting to have these conversations, you're likely not going to be good at it. And there's a chance that starting the consent convo will take you out of the mood, or that someone might no longer want to have sex with you because they feel that you're making it too complicated. Those are moments to ask yourself: Is it more important to have sex or more important to learn how to stand up for my needs?
"If someone doesn't make the space to have that kind of conversation with you, I would question if they're a person that you feel safe with," Mistress Velvet says. "A conscious and aware person would be like, 'Yeah, this feels really awkward and I don't have experience with this. Let's just try it out.'"
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