The Piece Of Statement Jewelry That Says, "Let's Drink!"

During Prohibition, a celebratory cocktail was about as big a status symbol as anything you could wear. Balancing a Gin Rickey or a French 75 between your fingers was step one. Step two was about making sure that everyone noticed your illicit beverage. Short of wearing a laser on each hand (which technically wasn't possible yet — those would be invented in 1960), women of the era looked to bigger-than-life rings to complement their glasses. They gave 'em a new name, too — the ever-prescriptive cocktail rings. And, like every trend born out of attention-seeking and sparkly-making, cocktail rings make a comeback each holiday season.
Given the accessory's history and impressive "Where'd you get that?" allure, it'd be a sin not to break one out as you're knocking 'em back this holiday season. Wear them to the cocktail parties you have on your agenda — obviously — but we think the piece is cool enough that it doesn't have to be saved for special occasions. It looks just as good with turtleneck sweaters and boyfriend jeans while sipping happy hour beer as it does with party frocks and swizzle sticks. So, raise your glass (or tumbler, or bottle, or cardboard coffee cup) to the best statement piece of the season.

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