The Most WTF Moments From The Moschino Runway

Photo: Pietro D'aprano/Getty Images.
With all the spurious fashion 'rules' out there — everything from not wearing white after Labour Day to the idea that runway models have to be a certain size — we need designers who are prepared to break the mould. Though they may not be perfect, fashion needs them more than we may think. Jeremy Scott, of both Moschino and his eponymous label, is one of those designers. His visions may be fairly 'out there', but his fashion is made with intention and consideration.
At his spring 2019 show for Moschino – which featured just about every model du jour you can think of – a few looks were so left-field that they actually made the collection better. Inspired by Yves Saint Laurent and the couturiers of yesterday, the runway backdrop featured a 2-D studio complete with mock sketches in rainbows of magic-marker scribbles. Sure, when designers want to have fun, referencing the '80s is quite common now. But Jeremy Scott lives in this headspace. He's sent trash down the runway and called it couture, painted models blue and called them 'aliens' (an attempted comment on the US immigration crisis), and he's taken inspiration from McDonald's.
That's what makes us excited for his H&M capsule in November. And it'll be why the people standing in line, waiting to get a piece of it, will face bemusement from those who maybe don't 'get it'. So here's a friendly reminder: fashion, sometimes, can just be fun to look at. Scroll through to see Jeremy Scott's latest WTF moments, modelled by Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, and more.

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