3 Experts on What's Missing From the Consent Discussion

Illustrated by Tristan Offit
In 1990, a group of women gathered at Antioch College to talk about the growing problem of rape on their campus, drafting the very first version of the school’s Sexual Offense Prevention Policy (SOPP). In doing so, they created what we now know as affirmative consent, decades before anyone else began using the term. The policy required that Antioch students ask for consent at every step of sexual encounters, from the first kiss, to taking off clothes, to oral sex or penetration. In short, the group who created the SOPP flipped the widely accepted "no means no" definition of consent to a "yes means yes" definition. They were then mocked mercilessly by everyone from their classmates to Saturday Night Live for challenging the status quo.
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Nearly 30 years later, people are finally seeing the wisdom of affirmative consent, and attempting to push the concept even further; the most popular consent definition of the moment, for instance, is enthusiastic consent,. It encourages people to ask for a verbal yes at every step of intimate interactions, but also recognizes that someone may feel coerced into agreeing to sex. So, in addition to the yes, enthusiastic consent encourages people to also notice nonverbal cues, such as whether or not their partner is kissing back, moaning, arching their back, or doing any number of things that makes it clear that they're really turned on.
The conversation about consent took another turn when the #MeToo movement arose late last year. Now, people are talking about how masculinity factors in. Instead of just demonizing men for not understanding consent, we're asking why they’re struggling with the concept in the first place. Mothers of young boys are starting to think about how to raise men to be good allies and to understand that they have to both ask for what they want and graciously accept when someone says no. Maybe it sounds simple, but it's a difficult task for a culture that tells boys and men that sex is, essentially, their birthright.
We're just starting to deconstruct the concept of masculinity that makes consent so confusing for cisgender men. But we haven't really touched upon how the narrative of sexual harassment, sexual assault, and consent change depending on someone's race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, financial background, ability, or other marginalized identities. Those conversations are happening, but they're often relegated to minority groups, instead integrated into the mainstream conversation. As the consent conversation continues to evolve, we need to consider and address how sexual harassment and assault impacts various communities. Ahead, we talk to three leaders in sexual education — Bethany Saltman, who co-wrote Antioch's Sexual Offense Prevention Policy in the 1990s, Ted Bunch, the co-founder of the violence prevention organization A Call To Men, and Bianca Laureano, foundress of the Women Of Color Sexual Health Network — about the evolution of consent, what's missing in mainstream conversations about consent, and what the next steps are to make consent unambiguous to all.
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Photographed by Hillary Harvey.

Bethany Saltman, co-writer of Antioch College's SOPP



Tell me a little about being at Antioch in the 1990s. How did your group start talking about consent?

"We heard the stories about women who had been raped and nothing was being done, and so we decided right then and there that we were going to do something. So in the conversation about what we wanted to change, we thought about how the current understanding of whether or not a rape had occurred was always looking for the woman saying no. That was the narrative. So, kind of in our innocence, we said, 'Well why don't we just turn it around and say that you have to actually say yes?' Not only to intercourse, but every time you escalate the interaction."

It's only recently that people are starting to see how amazing SOPP was. How long do you think it takes for radical change to happen?

"Generations. There are still so many people who think that [affirmative consent] is insane and ridiculous. The legal definition of rape and sexual assault is changing — but slowly."

Is there anything missing in the conversations we're having about consent right now?

"There are some conversations happening that are about the joy of consent. And that's the conversation I would like to bring forward; consent is a path to kindness and pleasure in our bodies and in ourselves. We shouldn't be looking at sexual delight as something that needs to be hidden in these dark recesses of desire. There's definitely something to mystery, but I think that the more enlightened we become as a culture, the more we'll see that we can be really honest with ourselves and allow for all the variation that is part of human sexuality and and still have a rockin' good time. And what it means to be joyful and really saying yes to ourselves, especially as women. Because in order to say 'yes' you have to really want sex."

Do you think the voices of men have a place in the conversation?

"Definitely. I've been teaching my daughter about what it means to consent her entire life. She gets to say who can touch her and who can kiss her, and I think we need to do that with all of our children. It's really not even about boys and girls. You're born with certain karma and a certain bag of tricks, and you need to know how to wield them respectfully. So 100%, every single one of us needs to be part of this conversation."

How does intersectionality play in? Do you think different populations are having different conversations about consent?

"Absolutely. Black women are sexualized in ways that white women are not, and white women are sexualized in ways that Black women are not. I like to approach all conversations with the posture of listening as much as possible."

So where do you think we go from here?

"It depends on who the 'we' is. I think people who are already engaged in conversations about consent should keep listening and asking themselves the tough questions when they get stuck. 'Where do I feel the line drawn between myself and someone else? Where do I get violent? Where do I get rigid? Where do I objectify? Where do I steal someone's agency?' The better we know ourselves, the better we can know other people, too."
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Photographed by Lynn Savarese.

Ted Bunch, co-founder of A Call To Men



When #MeToo was in full swing, a lot of people started talking about how we raise men. Do you think that's important in the conversation about consent?

"Oh, yes. Huge. One of the questions we ask high school boys in our workshops is 'Can you define consent.' Only 19% of those boys could actually define consent. Eight out of 10 boys did not know what consent was, which explains a lot. It explains why girls and women between 16 and 24 have the highest risk of being sexually assaulted. Boys actually think 'no' means try harder. They think 'no' means get her drunk or that they're not approaching it right and they have to change their approach. Boys are taught messages around conquering women and girls. They're not even supposed to have an interest in women and girls unless it's about sex. If a boy has girls who are friends, most of the time the men in his life are going to question why he'd spend time with a girl he didn't want to date, because it's against his paradigm. Just being friends with a woman is against this man box that we teach boys to be in, which stipulates that girls and women are sexual objects.

"Now, we have conversations with our boys all the time about going away to college, going out on dates, but most of the time it's about wearing a condom. Not about boundaries. Not about respect. So yes, [how we raise boys] needs to be a big part of the solution."

Do you think enough people are talking about including men into the consent conversation right now?

"I think the beauty of the #MeToo movement and this moment in time is that we all have had to look at how we impact other people. I don't think there's a man who exists who hasn't done something, said something, or witnessed another man committing sexual harassment or some sort of discrimination. So what's happening with men now is that we have to realize that, 'Oh wow, being a good guy with the women in my life is not enough. I have to look at how else I'm impacting women and girls, and how can I do better.'”

Do you think intersectionality plays into these conversations?

“It certainly does. When we look at the intersections — race, class, gender identity, sexuality, and [so] on — we can't address one without addressing the other. When we look at sexism, we also have to look at racism, and we have to look at class, and we have to look at heterosexual-ism, and how that plays out with homophobic messages and discrimination against the LGBTQ+ and gender non-conforming community members.

"We have this saying at A Call To Men that the liberation of men is directly tied to the liberation of women. We really believe that, because we know that as we increase and promote a healthy and respectful manhood, we decrease the presence of domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment, bullying, homophobia. It all would drop away."

How long do you think it will take to change how people are seeing consent?

"I'm very encouraged because we're developing the next generation of manhood right now. Historically, we've addressed this issue through intervention, right? Something has to happen to someone and then we respond to it. And now we're working toward prevention, where it never happens in the first place. So that's why these conversations are essential. And this is the first generation of men being held accountable for something men have always gotten away with.”
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Photographed by Uche Wogwugu.

Bianca Laureano, Foundress of Women Of Color Sexual Health Network



What do you think is missing in the mainstream conversation about consent right now?

"People always put consent in a sexual scenario, which is great, because it needs to be there. But it also needs to be in every other aspect of our lives: when we go to the doctor, when we're out in the world, when we're at school, when we're at home. Every human has the right to make decisions about what happens to their body, no matter if they're having sex or having a breast exam. And a lot of people don't always put those two concepts and realities into conversation with each other. So the consent conversations that we’re having are very one dimensional and only focus on sexuality. And the sexuality conversations we have are very narrow, and they really only focus on 'Okay, how do you not be a rapist?'

"Consent is required in many different situations. Asking my sibling if they're done in the bathroom before entering, for example, involves consent. It's about communication and feeling comfortable enough to be direct and clear about what we need and want, and listening and respecting what others need and want."

Some people say that we should be teaching bodily autonomy from birth. Do you agree with that?

"What's important there is the rejection piece. If you hear no, why do we call it rejection instead of self-determination? We've given the person an option and they've made a choice for themselves that's very concrete, so why aren't we celebrating that?

Is there anything that you think needs to change in the culture at large before we can change the way people are thinking about consent?

"I think having a clear definition and understanding of accountability and responsibility, and how those two things are essential to being a member of a community, a part of your family, an employee, a citizen of the world, whatever. When I say that, I think of bystanders. We hear a lot about bystander interactions and responsibilities.

"I've been at a crowded airport, crying, hysterically heaving, and everybody just stared at me. Then, Joe Schmo from the end of the line walks up to me and says, 'Do you need help?' And I said, 'Yes.' And he was like, 'What do you need?' And I said, 'Here's my airplane information. I need to change my flight. They just canceled it, and my mom just died.' Meanwhile, everybody continues to stare. People don't know how to act when they're confronted with certain things, whether it be tears, violence, or even laughter and joy. And I think doing that hard work of learning understanding, responsibility, and accountability could make a huge difference."

Are you seeing different conversations around consent happening in different identity groups? Are white women having a different conversation from women of color, for example?

"Oh, for sure, and there are definitely similarities, too. All of the communities that include people who identify as women or femmes talk about misogyny and how it impacts their lives every day. But the way that they talk about it and the examples that they use are very different. Black women might talk about when somebody calls them a 'Black bitch,' for example. And that being both racism and misogyny. White women might be complaining about being called a bitch, but they're not being called a white bitch. So the conversations around consent and misogyny are very color-free in certain communities.

"And in communities of people where there are mixed financial backgrounds or that are more impoverished, conversations about consent are rooted in conversations of power. Going to work with people who have been harmed at their big Fortune 500 company, they've talked about power in a very covert way. So people talk about the same things, but they talk about it very differently."

Do you think that those separate conversations need to start melding together in order to make any real change?

"Sometimes we do need to have isolated conversations that are free from the people who represent the groups that harm us. That can be essential to being able to understand and affirm that what you experienced really happened. Because if you're the only Black woman and you had a confrontation with a white woman and everybody else was white and didn't do anything, the feeling of rage is boundless. So, if you can't talk about that with other Black people then you might think: 'Am I making a big deal? What is happening?' It becomes a form of gaslighting where the silence makes us question our existence in our reality.

"But the world that we live in requires us to interact and engage with other people. So we eventually have to have interracial, inter-ethnic, and all the other inter-conversations with different people, so that we can begin to understand what's happening from others’ perspectives."

What do you think needs to change about the mainstream consent conversation right now?

"When people say things like 'enthusiastic consent,' that drives me bananas. It's ableist, and people can perform enthusiasm as a safety tactic. If I say to a young person, 'I know you're having a bad day, but I really need you to put on a happy face and act like you enjoy being here just for 20 minutes,' my students know exactly what to do. They sit up straight. They raised their hand. They call me Miss Whatever. They know how to perform. And that's a danger, I believe.

"Because then what happens to the neuro-diverse people who don't perform enthusiasm the way we expect them to? If people have in their head that enthusiastic consent does not look like how I'm behaving, then I'm not going to get what I need. It’s difficult to find definitions that aren’t ableist, but I define consent as: Direct words, behaviors, and actions that show a voluntary agreement to engage with others. Someone who is consenting is comfortable and aware of their surroundings and options. They are not being coerced or manipulated and are not debilitated by drugs or alcohol.

"I would just love for us to get to a point where asking for what we want is so common and so comfortable that it's not some big thing people are afraid of."
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