Watch This Charlotte Girl's Tearful Appeal To End Police Violence

A young girl delivered a powerful message of peace speaking at the first Charlotte City Council meeting since violence threatened to rip the city apart following the killing of Keith Lamont Scott.

Though two videos have since been released, neither has answered the key question: Was Scott pointing a gun at the officer that shot him? Regardless of the exact circumstances, protests have rocked the city. Against this backdrop, the girl spoke.

Zianna Oliphant was barely tall enough to reach the microphone, but she delivered one of the clearest appeals you'll ever hear to stop police violence when she spoke Monday.

“I’ve come here today to talk about how I feel, and I feel like that we are treated differently than other people,” she said. “I don’t like how we’re treated. Just because of our color...doesn’t mean anything to me.

She then burst into tears, but continued after encouragement from the crowd.

"It's a shame that our fathers and mothers are killed and we can't see them anymore," she said, crying. "It's a shame that we have to go to their graveyard and bury them. And we have tears. We shouldn't have tears. We need our fathers and mothers to be by our side."

Powerful words. Watch her full comments below.
Advertisement

More from US News

Watch

R29 Original Series

Watch Now
Documentary
Five love stories behind diverse, multicultural marriages.
Watch Now
Lifestyle
Life experiments, 5 days at a time.
Watch Now
Fashion
The style of subculture.
Watch Now
Beauty
Viral trends, tried and tested.
Watch Now
Documentary
From vibrators to lipstick, learn how your favorite products are made.
Watch Now
Documentary
Extraordinary, one-of-a-kind individuals
Watch Now
Documentary
The latest stories to watch.
Watch Now
Lifestyle
Inside the homes of millennial women — & what they paid for them
Watch Now
Comedy
Let's talk about sex, baby.
Watch Now
Documentary
Female artisans around the world
Watch Now
Politics
Made by and for smart, opinionated women.
Watch Now
Film
We helped 12 female directors claim their power.