Netflix Just Announced When You Is Coming Back

We don't have too long to wait for more You: Netflix has announced that part 1 of the fourth season will premiere on 9th February, followed by part 2 on 9th March.
As the streamer previously revealed, the new season will find Penn Badgley's obsessive serial killer Joe Goldberg living as a college professor in London.
"I'm not the lovable bookstore manager in New York, or the shop clerk in LA, or the doting husband in the suburbs now. Not anymore," Joe says in a teaser video that premiered in September. "Allow me to reintroduce myself: I’ve gone through a bit of refinement upon crossing the pond. And living in London has allowed me to bury the past, if you will."
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He adds, not entirely convincingly: "No, this time around, I’m focusing on academia and instruction, while keeping my typical extracurricular activities strictly professional."
Netflix has also teased that the new season will introduce a "new crew of posh friends" for Joe "including fiercely loyal art gallery director Kate (Charlotte Ritchie), outspoken literature major Nadia (Amy Leigh Hickman), irreverent author Rhys (Ed Speleers), wild aristocratic socialite Phoebe (Tilly Keeper) and her boyfriend Adam (Lukas Gage)".
Meanwhile, other new characters include "entrepreneur Sophie (Niccy Lin) and her introverted author brother Simon (Aidan Cheng), uber-privileged Oxford grad Gemma (Eve Austin), potty-mouthed former sportsman Connie (Dario Coates) and Nigerian princess/cryptocurrency aficionado Blessing (Ozioma Whenu)". 
When season three of You premiered last year, Refinery29's Maybelle Morgan explored the many (and fundamental) ways in which You is and always has been problematic.
"Yes, it’s a trashy American show designed to shock and entertain," she wrote, "and it never purported to take the moral high ground in reprimanding abusers – but with violence against women as rife as it’s always been and happening in the streets around us, surely it's time for TV shows to take more responsibility when it comes to these disturbing narratives against women they glamorise and the voices they give time to. For that reason, I’ve called time on my relationship with You."
It remains to be seen whether You will feel even more problematic for UK viewers now it's set on our "home turf" for the first time.

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