This Woman Might Have Chosen Your Outfit

Photographed by Eva K. Salvi.
We love trends as much as the next girl — unless the next girl is Sasha Sarokin, buying manager at NET-A-PORTER.COM. To say they are her life wouldn't be hyperbole: It's just a fact. Whether she's crisscrossing the globe to make the rounds at Fashion Week or cultivating relationships with new designers at the brand's London HQ, this style whisperer is THE source for unearthing the next big thing.
Aside from her eclectic and understated wardrobe (more on that later), Sarokin tabled her Vassar political science degree after one summer internship with a fashion company. That was when she really started writing her own fashion rules. And, though she ascribes to Coco Chanel's accessorizing advice — always remove one piece before leaving the house — she couldn't help but add her own twist. "I wouldn't necessarily choose the jewelry," she says. "More is more, but within a focus. A lot of everything is overwhelming. A lot of one thing works."
We sat down with this London-based expat to learn how she determines what global tastemakers will be wearing next season, how to spot a game-changing trend, and which pieces to stock up on now. Clothes might not make the woman, but we're starting to think the accessories might.

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