The 10 Most Iconic New York Sandwiches

Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
Other cities may attempt to rival New York as the food capital of the world, but when it comes to the city's sandwich game, it's got everyone beat. Seriously, new restaurants may pop up every single week, but some of the city's best culinary icons have been serving up unrivaled heroes, Reubens, subs, and more, for years. We scoured New York to find the 10 most iconic, most delicious, and most, well, New York, sandwiches within the five boroughs. Bagels and lox, pastrami on rye... All we can say is afterward, our stomachs were quite pleased.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: Pastrami Sandwich
Where: Katz's Delicatessen

Katz's Deli: The place itself is a New York institution. And its sandwiches — particularly the pastrami (which it serves roughly 10,000 pounds of per week) — are the type of paper-wrapped perfection you come to crave on the regular. The meat is cured, rubbed, smoked, boiled, and steamed to perfection before being served on rye with mustard. The best part? The servings are so huge, you'll likely have leftovers for days.

Katz's Delicatessen, 205 East Houston Street (at Ludlow Street); 212-254-2246.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: The Ruth Wilensky
Where: Mile End Deli

Named after the 91-year-old owner of Montreal deli Wilensky's Light Lunch, the sandwich boasts house-made beef salami with mustard on an onion roll. Consider it Mile End Deli's nod to the importance of the sandwich. History has never tasted so good.

Mile End Deli, 97A Hoyt Street (between Pacific Street and Atlantic Avenue), Brooklyn; 718-852-7510.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: Italian Combo
Where: Parm

Prepare yourselves for a whole lotta meat. Parm's Italian Combo is exactly what it sounds like: ham, pepperoni, mortadella, Genoa salami, and soppressata piled high on a classic (and so so fresh) hero roll. Mario Carbone, Rich Torrisi, and Jeff Zalaznick might just be the godfathers of the Italian sandwich.

Parm, 248 Mulberry Street (between Spring and Prince streets); 212-993-7189.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: The Dennis
Where: Parisi Bakery

Parisi has been baking fresh bread and goodies for over 100 years, and has earned itself some famous customers along the way — Frank Sinatra even had loaves of Parisi's bread flown down to his Palm Springs home once a week. The key to The Dennis, its most popular sandwich, is the freshness of its ingredients (something the family-owned bakert prides itself on): mozzarella, prosciutto, and tomatoes atop a chicken cutlet and dressed with pesto or balsamic vinegar.

Parisi Bakery, 198 Mott Street (between Kenmare and Spring Streets); 212-226-6378
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: Corned Beef on Rye
Where: Loeser's Kosher Deli

Although most authentic Jewish delis in Riverdale have closed, this neighborhood spot has persevered, maintaining its role as a Bronx staple for over 50 years. Grab one of its famous (and most popular): corned beef on rye with Russian dressing. Pickle on the side, obviously.

Loeser's Kosher Deli, 214 West 231st Street (at Godwin Terrace), Bronx; 718-548-9735.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: French Onion Grilled Cheese
Where: Little Muenster

New York may have a plethora of grilled cheese joints, but Little Muenster reigns supreme as the most creative — and delicious. The French Onion Grilled Cheese, however, is out of this world. And, why wouldn't it be, since it combines two of our favorite comfort foods into one unreal sandwich.

Little Muenster, 225 Liberty Street (between West Street and South End Avenue); 212-786-0186.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: The Classic
Where: Russ & Daughters

The Lower East Side icon is one of the only appetizing shops left in New York City — in Jewish tradition, "appetizing" means "the foods one eats with bagels." And seriously, what's more geshmak than the classic bagel with cream cheese and smoked salmon? The place has been serving up nearly 200 a day for the past 100 years, so you know it's doing something right.

Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston Street (between Allen and Orchard streets); 212-475-4880.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: The Bomb
Where: Sal, Kris, & Charlie's Deli

For only $7, you can get a 12-inch sandwich with everything on it: The Bomb comes packed with multiple types of lunch meats, cheeses, toppings, and dressings. It might just be the biggest — and best — meal in Queens.

Sal, Kris, & Charlie's Deli, 33-12 23rd Avenue (between 33rd and 35th streets), Astoria; 718-278-9240.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: Scuttlebutt
Where: Saltie

The Scuttlebutt has become the ultimate delight for sandwich-loving vegetarians. Its combo of hard-boiled eggs, feta, black olives, capers, pickles, and pimento aioli smushed between two delicious slices of focaccia bread (made in-house, by the way) has rightfully earned itself a serious cult-like following.

Saltie, 378 Metropolitan Avenue (at Havemeyer Street), Brooklyn; 718-387-4777.
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Photographed by Will Styer; Food Styled by Jen Beauchesne.
What: Lobster Roll
Where: Red Hook Lobster Pound

Whether you go Maine-, Connecticut-, or Tuscan-style, you won't be disappointed by this Brooklyn kitchen's lobster rolls. The large chunks of fresh seafood goodness are mixed with homemade mayonnaise, paprika, scallions, celery and served in a J.J Nissen bun. What better way to get that summer sweetness all year-round?

Red Hook Lobster Pound, 284 Van Brunt Street (between Verona Street and Visitation Place), Brooklyn; 718-858-7650.
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