Sarah Silverman Says Louis C.K. Asked To Masturbate In Front Of Her

Photo: Taylor Hill/FilmMagic.
UPDATE: This story was originally published on October 22.
In response to Sarah Silverman's comments about her friendship with Louis C.K. and the instances when the comedian consensually masturbated in front of her, one of C.K.'s accusers Rebecca Cory spoke out on Twitter. Corry challenged Silverman's assertion that because Silverman and Louis C.K. were equals, the behaviour was acceptable.
"To be real clear, CK had 'nothing to offer me' as I too was his equal on the set the day he decided to sexually harass me," Corry wrote. "He took away a day I worked years for and still has no remorse. He’s a predator who victimized women for decades and lied about it."
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Silverman heard the criticism loud and clear, and issued an apology to Corry.
"Rebecca I’m sorry. Ugh this is why I don’t like weighing in. I can’t seem to do press 4 my show w/out being asked about it," she replied. "But you’re right- you were equals and he fucked with you and it’s not ok. I’m sorry, friend. You are so talented and so kind."
"Thank you. I know exactly how you feel," Corry continued. "I can’t seem to live my life without getting rape & death threats, harassed & called a cunt regularly for simply telling the truth. I’m sorry your friend created this situation. We deserve to do our art without having to deal with this shit."
Original story published below.
Sarah Silverman got candid on The Howard Stern Show on Monday about her experience being friends with Louis C.K. and how he would consensually masturbate in front of her from time to time. (In November 2017, C.K. was accused by five women of masturbating in front of them without their consent. The comedian admitted to the accusations.)
"I'm not making excuses for him, please don't take this that way. But we are peers, we're equals," Silverman told Stern. "So when we were kids and he asked if he could masturbate in front of me, sometimes I'd go, 'Fuck yeah, I want to see that.'"
However, she was quick to clarify that her experiences with him are "not analogous to the other women who are talking about what he did to them. He could offer me nothing, we were only just friends. So sometimes, yeah, I wanted to see it. It was amazing. Sometimes I'd be like, 'Fucking gross! Get pizza!'"
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A rep for Silverman did not immediately respond to Refinery29's request for comment.
Apparently, this type of behaviour was par for the course in their friendship. She recalled one time that they went streaking in the elevator of one of their apartment buildings. "We were letting our freak flags fly," she said, adding, "It was exhilarating and...I'm just talking about separate experiences."
Silverman has been vocal about the comedian since the accusations, opening an episode of her Hulu show I Love You, America with a powerful monologue. "It's a real mind-fuck, because I love Louis, but Louis did these things," she explained. "Both of those statements are true, so I just keep asking myself, 'Can you love someone who did bad things? Can you still love them?'"
She later told GQ that she is still friends with C.K., and that she doesn't want him to suffer forever.
"There are people that just deny everything they're accused of and they continue to be the politicians or the filmmakers that they are," she told the outlet. "And there are people that come and say, 'I'm guilty of these things, and I'm wrong, and I want to be changed from this. And yet those are the ones that kind of are excommunicated forever."
If you have experienced sexual violence of any kind, please visit Rape Crisis or call 0808 802 9999.
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