The Act Sees Gypsy Post About Dee Dee's Death On Facebook— Here's How It Happened IRL

Photo: Courtesy of Hulu.
On the penultimate and seventh episode of The Act, Gypsy Rose Blanchard and Nicholas Godejohn’s (Joey King and Calum Worthy) plans to get away with the murder of Dee Dee Blanchard all fall apart after they make a Facebook post from Dee Dee's (Patricia Arquette) account without even turning off their location first. On the show, which is fictionalized, that Facebook post is what leads the police to find Dee Dee’s body and then arrest Gypsy and Nick at the Godejohn house in Wisconsin, but did Gypsy and Godejohn really post a murder message on Facebook? Well, it turns out they actually did — and the way it played out in the real world only slightly differs from what the Hulu series shows.
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In The Act, Gypsy and Nick decide to write the Facebook post because Gypsy is worried that Dee Dee’s body would never be discovered, and she’d never be able to go home. She wanted to write something that would be similar to what a murderer might say, and eventually, they landed on writing, “That Bitch is dead!”
In reality, Gypsy and Godejohn posted the exact same message on Facebook, and it was that post that led authorities to their arrest. When giving her testimony during Godejohn’s 2018 trial for Dee Dee’s murder, Gypsy said that she made the posts pretending to be Godejohn in hopes that it would help police find Dee Dee. Gypsy herself said she hoped she would never be found and would remain a missing person.
“I wanted her to be found. I wanted the cops to find her body,” she said, according to a video obtained by the Springfield News-Leader.
And they did, but by June 16, 2015, Gypsy and Godejohn were arrested in Wisconsin, where they were staying with his family.
Today, Dee Dee’s Facebook page remains public but has been memorialized, and the murder message that Gypsy and Godejohn shared is actually still up — along with the comments that people posted as they tried to figure out what was going on. There are 166 comments and 20,000 shares on the post, although commenting has been turned off.
It’s hard to say what might have happened if the Facebook post wasn’t made. Would Gypsy and Godejohn still have been caught? It might have taken even longer for authorities to figure out what happened. But in the end, it was what ultimately led to their downfall.
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