You Can Buy A Seat At Fashion Week For The Price Of 8 Cars

fashion-week-embedPhotographed by Sunny Shokrae.
It should come as no shock that fashion is an expensive business. What else would you expect from an industry that is, at its core, a marriage of art and commerce?
Even so, this one took us by surprise. British Vogue reported recently that the Watermill Center Summer Auction will be offering two front-row seats to some of the biggest shows at Fashion Week, and the bidding starts at — wait for it — $25,000. Not into the bidding game? No problem! There is a "buy it now" option for a nosebleed-inducing $95,000.
Fashion week is an industry event, and it's crazy to think that it's been blown up so much that someone would be willing to pay nearly a hundred grand for what is, essentially, a day at someone else's job. Maybe it's time the fashion world learned to keep more than just its hemlines in proportion.
If you do have $95,000 to spare, but are wondering whether getting two chairs for a couple of hours is the best way to spend it, the Huffington Post has compiled a list of other things your could buy for $95,000 — including 6,440 movies (3,838 with popcorn) and 39 years of unlimited salad and breadsticks. Now, that might be worth it. (Huffington Post)
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