Emma Stone & Matthew McConaughey Are Not Cool With Your Mean Tweets

Internet trolls say the darndest things. Things like, "Emma Stone looks like she smells like cat piss." Or, "Ashton Kutcher needs to be hit by a bus. ASAP." And, most damning of all: "Oh, fuck off, June Squibb." That's not a very nice thing to say to the grandmotherly Oscar-nominated actress.
On the bright side, those nasty comments have inspired yet another round of "Celebrities Read Mean Tweets" on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Last night's segment included Mindy Kaling being knocked for her "annoying voice," Gary Oldman gamely cracking up over his online disses, and Matthew McConaughey contemplating just what it means to be called a "dick turd."
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Sofia Vergara obviously didn't take kindly to a tweet suggesting she sounded like she had a certain phallic object in her mouth. Her comeback? "What's wrong with having a dick in your mouth?" (That was a rhetorical question, by the way.)
As hilarious as this segment is, it should make foul-mouthed tweeters think twice before posting insults online. Do you really want June Squibb telling you to "fuck off" on national TV? (Uproxx)


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