Jennifer Lawrence Inches Closer Towards Sainthood

When most of us go home for the holidays, our daily agenda includes a lot of snacks, a lot of sleep, and even more Full House reruns. In our heads, self-proclaimed Uncle Jesse-lover Jennifer Lawrence is there shedding a tear with us when Jesse learns that his Papouli has died. Then, J. Lawr challenges us to a game of Steal The Old man's Bundle and we ask her to prom before being taken in for psychiatric evaluation. Because no one's there. We're 31, prom was 15 years ago, and our mother is concerned.
So, while we spent our holidays telling a man with a clipboard that we weren't loved enough as a child, Lawrence was actually out adding "humanitarian" to her illustrious resume. The Hunger Games star paid a visit to the young patients at Kosair Children’s Hospital in her hometown, Louisville, Ky. and happily posed for photos with patients and staff alike. Lawrence doesn't have Twitter because if she did, the world might explode. So, we must thank the J. Lawr devoted Twitter feed @JenniferUpdates for compiling the heartwarming images from the December 22 visit. Now, if she'll just visit a psychiatric ward in Toronto next, a certain besotted, delusional writer would be eternally grateful. (Twitter)

Images courtesy of Twitter
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