Inside The Paris Review Offices

In New York City's esteemed literary world, there are parties, and then there are The Paris Review parties. Indeed, as long as the quarterly journal has garnered respect for discovering new writing talent — Jack Kerouac, Adrienne Rich, and David Foster Wallace, to name a few — it's also been known for its all-night, booze-flowing soirées where society and the counterculture drink from the same bottle of whiskey.
“It’s always been two things at once,” says editor Lorin Stein. “On the one hand, it’s a hyper-sophisticated, modernist, avant-garde magazine. On the other hand, it’s sort of a destination party.” And over the decades, the 60-year-old publication has continually attracted an eclectic crowd, from Jackie O, Truman Capote, and Norman Mailer, to more recently, Zadie Smith, Malcolm Gladwell, and the editors of Vice.
This spring, Stein moved his staff from their former Tribeca loft space up to the Chelsea art district. And the revelers have followed, as evidenced by the shoulder-to-shoulder crowd during their recent 2013 summer-issue fête. But life isn't just a party (if only) — there's work to be done, too. So what is the day-to-day style of The Paris Review? Click ahead to meet their staffers and find out.

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