The First Royal Family Member Has Tested Positive For Coronavirus

Photo: Samir Hussein/WireImage.
Prince Charles has tested positive for COVID-19, the novel coronavirus that's thrown the world into a pandemic, according to People. A spokesperson for Clarence House confirmed that the Queen's son is self-isolating along with wife, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, who tested negative for the virus. The statement emphasises that the 71-year-old is displaying only mild symptoms of the virus, and is otherwise healthy.
"The Prince of Wales has tested positive for Coronavirus. He has been displaying mild symptoms but otherwise remains in good health and has been working from home throughout the last few days as usual," a spokesperson told People. "The Duchess of Cornwall has also been tested but does not have the virus. In accordance with Government and medical advice, the Prince and the Duchess are now self-isolating at home in Scotland. The tests were carried out by the NHS in Aberdeenshire where they met the criteria required for testing."
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Prince Charles is now the first member of the Royal Family to have tested positive for the virus, but the statement goes on to say it's unknown from whom he contracted the virus due to "the high number of engagements he carried out in his public role during recent weeks."
He most recently came in contact with the Queen on March 12, who the statement says is following the appropriate health guidelines.
Last week, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, who recently stepped down from their royal duties, shared a message of encouragement on Instagram for those struggling during this stressful time.
"Yes, there is isolation and physical distancing, but there doesn’t have to be loneliness," they wrote on Instagram, going on to list a number of resources and suggestions for those in isolation.
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With everything going on, it’s a lot to take in. Many of us may feel confused. Or alone, or anxious or scared...and in isolation, some of us may just feel bored, or that you don’t know what to do with yourself without your normal routine. It’s perfectly normal to be feeling any of these things. Our emotional well-being is challenged everyday whether we realise it or not, but our lives are usually filled with distractions. Now with constantly changing COVID coverage, we are all adjusting to this new normal and the feelings that come with it. But here’s the good thing (because right now we need to hear good things, right?): Yes, there is isolation and physical distancing, but there doesn’t have to be loneliness. There are resources that can help us all through this process, and ways that YOU can become one of those resources. @crisistextline @giveusashoutinsta @kidshelpphone and CTL Ireland are organisations that need new volunteers now more than ever and have an open door for you to get the support you need. • - If you’re home and feeling bored, you can digitally train to be a counselor and HELP someone who really needs your support! What an amazing way to use this time • - If you feel alone, overwhelmed, depressed, or anxious, you can text one of these lines and talk it through. • - If you are in an abusive relationship and now find yourself in isolation with your abuser, these counselors are there for you. You do not need to suffer in silence. And for those of you who don’t feel comfortable texting with a stranger, reach out to your friends, family and colleagues. Phone calls and video conferencing are such a great way to feel more connected - ask if they’re okay, tell them how you’re (actually) feeling, and use this time to really listen for the answer. If there is someone you know and are worried about, your text may be the thing that saves their life.

A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal) on

Someone send this post to Prince Charles, ASAP.
The World Health Organization says you can protect yourself by washing your hands, covering your mouth when sneezing or coughing (ideally with a tissue), avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth and don't get too close to people who are coughing, sneezing or with a fever.
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