The UK Girl-Zines Challenging Traditional Media

From fan fiction to politics to intersectional feminism, the zine has always been marked by one distinctive trait: passion. Originally defined as a "self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images usually reproduced via photocopier", the resurgence of the zine in 2016 looks a lot more polished but they're still a political reaction to the state of mainstream media in the UK today. We decided to track down the women behind the most exciting and challenging zines being produced in the UK today.

All married by a frustration with mainstream content magazines and newspapers, these are the publications saying 'no' to large-circulation media outlets who marginalise and mute subcultures such as the transgender community, feminists, immigrants, nudists, and nihilists. Here are the platforms representing diversity and liberalism. Whether taking discussions that had begun on Tumblr about radical feminism into a (slightly) more formalised place, or championing the immigrant experience in the UK, these zines are forces of opinion and humour (with some rather good quizzes to boot). Over to the editors...

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