5 Artists Explore The Impact Of The Sanitation Crisis On Women

Did you know that one in three women around the world don't have access to decent toilets? That's 1.1 billion women and girls who risk poor health, harassment – even attack – when waiting until nighttime to seek a private space to relieve themselves. Can you imagine being on your period, having diarrhoea or just, you know, going for a wee without four walls around you? When carrying out a basic human function risks the safety (and dignity) of so many women, it's a feminist issue.
Out of Order is a multimedia exhibition exploring the impact this has on women globally. Charity WaterAid has collaborated with artists from the UK and Sierra Leone (where 85% of women are affected) to create works responding to the crisis.
Through graphic colours, abstract drawings and moving storyboards, the artists raise awareness of WaterAid's campaign in Tombohuaun, Sierra Leone, which aims to raise £4 million to bring clean water, decent toilets and good hygiene to women across the world.
Ahead, we speak to five of the artists who created works for Out of Order about their craft, their creative process, and what they learned from the campaign.
Out of Order is at the Old Truman Brewery in east London from Thursday 16th – Sunday 19th November, 11am-7pm. The exhibition is free but donations from visitors will be warmly welcomed. Any money donated by the UK public to WaterAid's Untapped appeal before 31st January 2018 will be doubled by the UK government, meaning that WaterAid can continue to help even more people and improve toilet conditions for women all over the world.

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