Maison Martin Margiela's Home Line Wants To White-Wash Your Apartment

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Though rumors of Maison Martin Margiela's retirement circulated furiously after the house's show is Paris last month, that certainly isn't stopping the iconoclastic label from branching out into other, wider domains. Yesterday, the line showcased a selection of home objects at the international furniture and design exhibition in Milan. Though we expected chairs with legs poking out of them, a rug made out of wigs, or at the very least an armchair with extra-strong shoulders, these pictures seem to show just some bottles with lampshades stuck on top, which we made for a Home Ec project in 10th grade. WWD reports that there was also "a chair turned into a swing, and a calendar made of crisp white cotton sheets, which can be recycled as napkins." So, meaning, at the end of a year, you can wipe your sticky fingers on your old calendar? We weren't there, but we're confused. Nonetheless, we'd still love to turn our place into an all-white Margiela heaven (the designer's Parisian studio is, famously, devoid of all color). So is it too much to ask that the napkin calendar doesn't cost more than a Bounty roll? (WWD)
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