11 Songs You Didn't Realize Were Sampled On Lemonade

Photo: Greg Allen/REX/Shutterstock.
For all you Beyoncé Lemonade superfans out there, this slideshow is about to change your whole listening experience.

After wading through the dozens and dozens (and dozens) of stories about the hair, the memes, the lyrics, and the drama, it's time to talk about the actual music on the album. And there is a LOT to talk about.

It's clear that Beyoncé and her creative team covered a wide range of musical genres when pulling song samples for the album. Some are immediately recognizable ("Maps" — not the one by Maroon 5), while others are much subtler ("When the Levee Breaks.") Whatever the case, each sampled song adds a wonderful richness and complexity to the overall sound of the album.

The impressive list of credits on this project is miles long. One song even boasts over 15 contributors. It takes a village, y'all. In addition to the music, I highly recommend listening to the compelling work of Warsan Shire, the 26-year-old poet who provided the stirring spoken-word transitions throughout the visual album.

Ahead, 11 songs sampled on Lemonade. You might recognize more than you think. And you may just discover your new favorite jam from the '60s.
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "Hold Up"
Tell me the opening chords to Andy Williams' "Can't Get Used to Losing You" haven't been stuck in your head all day, adding a little spring to your step. Cause you'd be lying.
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "Hold Up"
The lyric "Hold up, they don't love you like I love you" is the heart and soul of Bey's track. It may sound eerily familiar, because it's a slightly tweaked version of the repeated chorus in "Maps," sung by Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "Hold Up"
Who knew that Beyoncé also appreciates my tweenage "getting ready for school" anthem? She altered the lyrics of "Turn My Swag On" by Soulja Boy Tell'em to say, "Get my swag on / I look in the mirror and say wussup."
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Sampled In "Don't Hurt Yourself"
Fucking. Led. Zeppelin. You will immediately recognize the drums on Bey's track once you listen to "When the Levee Breaks."
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "6 Inch"
Isaac Hayes, the funk, blues, and Southern soul singer-songwriter is also responsible for other classics like "Soul Man" from Sam & Dave. The trembling organ notes from the beginning of this song paired with The Weeknd's falsetto are a match made in heaven. Fun fact: Hayes was the voice of Chef on South Park for a few years.
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "6 Inch"
A trippy little number that is credited on "6 Inch."
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "Freedom"
This '60s group is the best discovery I made while researching this story. I dig everything from the group's name (Kaleidoscope) to the rattling drums that segue into the heart of "Let Me Try." Add in those Kendrick Lamar lyrics, and it's no wonder "Freedom" is one of the standout songs on the album's stellar track list.
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "Freedom"
Alan Lomax, a legendary collector of folk art, was responsible for "Stewball" by Ed Lewis. Lomax traveled around the country recording spiritual sermons, work songs, blues performances, and other anthropological aspects of the life and sounds of the South. Some of his recorded work can be heard in the background of the intro to "Freedom."
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via YouTube.
Featured In "Forward"
"Overgrown” is not directly sampled, but this slow, emotional song is very similar to Blake's resonant vocals on "Forward."

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via YouTube.
Sampled In "All Night"
The trumpets sampled from Outkast's "SpottieOttieDopaliscious" leave you with a triumphant feeling at the end of the turbulent Lemonade journey.
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via YouTube.
Sampled In "Formation"
It's not a song, but this monologue from comedian and performer Messy Mya has become iconic as the opening line of "Formation."
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