This Is The Scariest Halloween Sketch Saturday Night Live Has Ever Aired

On last night's episode of Saturday Night Live, sketch writers looked no further than the White House to invoke a sense of terror and fright during their Halloween-themed digital short.
The scene opens with CNN anchor Anderson Cooper wrapping up a late night on set. Already, the tone is eerily reminiscent of an all too familiar horror movie. Re-creating the opening scene from Stephen King's film IT, the talented impressionist Kate McKinnon takes on the role of White House senior advisor Kellyanne Conway as SNL compares her to the nightmarish villain Pennywise attempting to lure Anderson Cooper into the sewer.
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"Hello, Coopy. It's me, Kellyanne Conway," she says from the darkness as Kellywise.
Saturday Night Live / YouTube.
McKinnon as Conway desperately tries to tempt the news anchor to put her on TV offering wildly inaccurate quotes such as "Okay, so Secretary Tillerson did not call the President a moron. They were sharing a sundae, and the President asked if he wanted more sprinkles, and the Secretary says 'more on.'"
Anderson Cooper isn't the only news anchor Kellywise has lured into the sewer. At one point, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow makes an appearance alongside her.
Deftly switching between the voice of Pennywise and Conway, McKinnon tries all her tricks to lure Cooper into the sewer eventually posing as Hillary Clinton offering a free copy of her book, What Happened, which proved to be Cooper's downfall.
This is a far cry from last year's Halloween sketch where a haunted elevator advertising "100 floors of frights" isn't so much scary as it is confusing. Host Tom Hanks was David S. Pumpkins, an unknown and unimpressive Halloween character complete with skeleton backup dancers.
Saturday Night Live / YouTube.
Last year's tone was lighthearted and existed in a world where all the scariest things were pretend. Everything about this year's Halloween sketch, from the music to the cinematography, is meant to put the viewer at a sense of unease as they laugh at the warped reality woven in. While SNL's writers used the familiar format of one of 2017's most talked about movies, the most unsettling parts were those that weren't a work of fiction.
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