Amy Schumer Tells R29 Why Being Famous Is Still Really Weird

Photo: Joanne Davidson/SilverHub/REX/Shutterstock
This Mother's Day, Amy Schumer is sharing the screen with icon Goldie Hawn for the mother-daughter buddy comedy Snatched. In the new flick, Schumer plays Emily, a newly-single woman who doesn't totally have it together — but is willing to have a great time regardless. While Schumer may play characters still figuring things out, the actress seemingly has a lot of the important stuff already nailed in her personal life.
It shouldn't surprise anyone that Schumer knows exactly who she is: the actress radiates confidence in both her stand-up comedy and in her fearless sketches on Inside Amy Schumer, many of which take jabs at sexism and her own haters. Needless to say, she won't let naysayers (which seemingly come with the territory of being a woman in comedy) knock her off her feet.
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Refinery29 spoke with Schumer at the Snatched press day about mothers, daughters, and how she cultivates her confidence:
What do you think mothers can teach their daughters about confidence?
"They can teach them from example. If you see your mother looking in the mirror and going 'Ugh,' I think you learn that kind of behavior. Having your own confidence [as a mother] is the best way to [teach your children.]"
When you posed for Annie Leibovitz last year, you said you felt more beautiful than you ever had in your life. What was going through your mind, leading up to that photo?
"Annie didn't want to do it. She was hesitant to do it, at first. She's really aware and wants everyone to be comfortable. I was like 'I really want to do it, I want to be nude, and I want you to be the photographer.' When she saw I was really comfortable with it, that changed. It felt really powerful, and I was really excited about it."

"There's nothing for me to get over. This is my body. This is my face. This is it. I don't strive for this other version."

Amy Schumer
So many people are shifting away from the pressure to love your body, and more towards body acceptance. Does that ring true for you?
"That's so funny. People are just lowering their standards. [Laughs] I'm not like rolling around in bed going 'Yaaas,' but I think I can feel great. I can be feeling myself! Like I shot that InStyle cover and I was really feeling myself that day. I think that sort of acceptance... when I see myself in this movie, in a bathing suit, I'm fine. There's nothing for me to get over. This is my body. This is my face. This is it. I don't strive for this other version. I want to be healthy, and my weight fluctuates and whatever, but... I feel like other people need to work on accepting my body. Or not! People need time to decide how they feel about my body... I don't think about [my body]... I want to be healthy.
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"I've never worried about it. When I was younger my mom would be like 'Don't forget to suck in [your stomach.]' I was always like, belly out. I've never cared. I don't know why. I feel really lucky that I don't. I see friends who have a lot of pain about it. Girls who are way thinner than me, way prettier than me, who feel worse than me. I do wish for everyone to feel good about themselves. I feel so bad for this younger generation, growing up with all this social media and stuff. It just seems like such a hard time to grow up."

"Someone said that I punched Melania Trump and that I'm in jail... That was not true."

Amy Schumer
Do you think social media is changing how women feel about their bodies?
"Yeah, and maybe some of it is good. There are really positive accounts. Or maybe they find the filter that they like and they use it and they feel better about themselves. But the constant awareness and need for material, well, you used to only have a website if you were famous. Now every child has a website, that's like 'Here's my life, that I'm curating.' It's a lot."
What was the most amusing fabricated story you read about yourself?
"That I'm in jail. That I punched someone and I'm in jail... Someone said that I punched Melania Trump and that I'm in jail... That was not true.
"But you know, there's so many lies. It's really interesting when it starts happening to you, because you read about celebrities in magazines your whole life, and when it happens to you, it's so weird. At first you really want to fight for the truth to come out, and then you realize that the truth does not matter to anybody... Or, well, not anybody. The people like me, who like me, they know the truth. It's the people who have already made their mind up who [you can't change the mind of.]
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"The surveillance is weird. Now, anytime I'm outside, there is a chance that someone is going to take a picture of me. That's weird."
Does that change your behavior in public at all?
"[Laughs] No! It's this weird feeling. You're walking down the street, and it's fine, and then people pop out and take pictures of you. So you're walking down the street and you have a constant fear. It's just a violation. If your friends started coming up to you and started taking pictures of you, it would annoy you. So if it's strangers, taking photos of every angle of your body to post [online], it's a violation... It sucks. There are people with worse situations, but it sucks."
Who is your favorite role model of 2017?
"I think Gloria Steinem is pretty badass. She's someone who's willing to put their money where their mouth is and dedicate their life to hard decisions and bigger work. I think it's really noble."
What do you do to get your confidence back on days you feel not-s0-great?
"Sending really unflattering pictures to your friends. Just laughing with your friends about it. Or just going out for a walk, moving. I think that's it."
What message will Snatched send to mothers and daughters everywhere?
"I think it'll be different for everybody, but everyone I know who has seen the movie has called their mom. I saw it with my mom, it was really special. I imagine it's really triggering because you watch it and you're like 'Ugh, that's how my mom makes me feel.' But [the movie] is really sweet, and I think it shows the perspective of both mothers and daughters."
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