Lane Bryant's Latest Campaign Is All About Body Inclusivity

Photo: Courtesy of Lane Bryant.
Recently, the cult of individuality has been beating down the doors of the fashion industry, and we’re finally seeing real improvements for body inclusivity: Barbie’s got brand new bodies; established designers are expanding their size ranges; and Aerie cast a gorgeous model for its most recent swim ad, who put her rolls on full display. Even if this current evolution of acceptance and diversity is sometimes referred to as a “trend,” it's creating a tidal wave of positive advancements — the latest being Lane Bryant’s new "This Body" campaign.
The brand is no stranger to controversy surrounding its advertisements, and with this latest outing, it's harnessing recent attention to keep pushing for body acceptance and to empower its customer base (and all women, really). “Lane Bryant redefined sexy with the #ImNoAngel campaign," the brand's CEO and president, Linda Heasley, says. "We started the conversation with a bit of humor, and obviously struck a chord. We continued the conversation and focused on more and better representation with the #PlusIsEqual campaign. Today’s 'This Body' campaign cites the conversation as overdue, unavoidable, and a rapidly progressing cultural (r)evolution, and allows Lane Bryant to continue to be [a] platform for shifting perception. This campaign continues a provocative manifesto to remind the world what we stand for...”
Featuring top plus models, like Ashley Graham, Precious Lee, Tara Lynn, Denise Bidot, and Georgia Pratt, the images were shot by renowned photographer Cass Bird. "This Body" is a declaration (and an invitation) to let the world know how plus-size women feel about their bodies, as demonstrated on the hand-written shirts worn in the campaign. “We want our target customer, the industry, and the world in general to conclude that it’s obvious, it’s self-evident, that all women are beautiful and should be seen and celebrated," Heasley continued.

"Our goal is to shift the perception from Lane Bryant as a store for plus-size clothing, to Lane Bryant as an inspiring brand for empowered, beautiful, and confident women. The fashion industry is famously ridiculously exclusive, and the retail industry tends to echo that nonsense. We’ve seen it on the fashion runways and in print for decades, and though we’ve made some progress, a larger size model even today can still raise eyebrows and be seen as ‘imperfect.’ I’m completely confident that the next generation will look back on these days of exclusion and shake their heads in wonder that it was ever common practice. Toward that end, the Lane Bryant campaigns challenge the viewpoints of the media. We nurture the emerging understanding that values all women equally, no matter shape or size. We take it as a matter of course that women of all shapes and sizes should appear in media, advertisements, and campaigns.”

We’re equally as optimistic for the future of body diversity and inclusivity as we are curious to see how Lane Bryant’s latest venture will impact and influence the fashion industry at large. To take the conversation ever further, we spoke with the quintet of models fronting the campaign about their bodies. Read on to see what they had to say, and let us know in the comments below what your body is made for.
Photo: Courtesy of Lane Bryant.

Tara Lynn

What is your body made for?
"Love."
How do you feel about your body?
"I love my body, and I'm grateful for every day that I get to live in it and love in it and experience everything it means to be alive."
What advice do you have for other people who might be struggling with body image?
"Love your body. Love yourself. You deserve that. Either perfect doesn't exist, or it's everywhere. The struggle to be better shouldn't overshadow your right to love yourself exactly as you are right now."

Georgia Pratt

What is your body made for?
"Really good hugs!"
How do you feel about your body?
"She’s number one. She rules."
What advice do you have for other people who might be struggling with body image?
"Be kind to yourself and surround yourself with people who radiate good energy, and are open-minded and supportive of you. Truly, as soon as you stop comparing yourself to others and disconnect your mind from numbers, images, sizes, and weights you think you 'should' be, it’s easier to communicate with your body in a real way and care for it the right way."

Denise Bidot

What is your body made for?
"My body is made for living (in the moment)."
How do you feel about your body?
"My thoughts about my body vary from day-to-day, but ultimately I feel my body is a beautiful masterpiece in the making. While it's still a work in progress, I have learned to love my body, flaws and all."

What advice do you have for other people who might be struggling with body image?
"Stop trying to be perfect and learn to be happy just as you are. There are lessons to learn along the way, but you have to enjoy each of those moments and learn to really love yourself. Allow yourself the opportunity to live and be alive. Its not about what size you are; it's about being happy and living in the moment."
Photo: Courtesy of Lane Bryant.

Ashley Graham

What is your body made for?
"Starting a revolution. I realized I could use my career as a model to create change and disrupt the fashion industry, so I started calling myself a 'body activist' to help redefine society's definitions of beauty."

How do you feel about your body?
"It took me years to gain enough confidence to say this, but I truly love my body — every curve, every dimple, every part of me that society calls a 'flaw.' My body is strong; it's sexy, and taking care of it is one of my highest priorities."
What advice do you have for other people who might be struggling with body image?
"Speak to your body. Talk to the things that you don't like, and start affirming yourself in the mirror every day. When you're thinking positively, you will look in the mirror and see all of your positive qualities. This is how I gained love and trust for my body."
Photo: Courtesy of Lane Bryant.

Precious Lee

What is your body made for?
"My body is made for me to love every inch. My body is made for changing the game. My body is made for proving them wrong. My body is made for living out loud. My body is made for starting a revolution."

How do you feel about your body?
"I am in love with my body. I know that some people may feel that's a self-centered thing to say, but when it comes to your body, your opinion is the one that counts. I love my body because it was given to me for a greater purpose, not to be picked apart. It's here for me to appreciate every inch. I know that my curves are unique to only me, and I think that's amazing."
What advice do you have for other people who might be struggling with body image?
"Not having a positive body image can really be dangerous. We do and say things that are detrimental to our self-esteem every day, and every time it chips away a piece of us. It's time to stop the negative self-talk. When you feel like it's okay for you to abuse your body by vocalizing negative thoughts, it becomes a downward spiral. Try every single day to not have the defeated talk about your thighs or your stretch marks. Instead, flip the script and go straight to your least favorite body part and claim your love for it. It works! Confident people work to maintain positive self-image. You have to know first that anything you truly want you can have, including self-love. It's not an overnight process, and it's not a magic pill. It's consistency with how you treat yourself every day."

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