65% of Americans Are Losing Sleep Due to This Major Worry

Photographed by Michael Beckert.
It’s no surprise that many Americans — people around the world really — are lacking in the sleep department. Studies around sleep behavior have proven time and time again, that if we want healthier lives, we’ve got to fall in love with our beds again. Though, once we slip into bed, actually getting to sleep poses an entirely new set of problems.
And according to a CreditCards.com poll, many of us are kept wake into the wee hours of the morning for the same reason. As for the binding culprit making us stagger into work the next day? Money.
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The study notes that despite a reportedly “stable economy” our financial anxiety has risen by 4% since 2009’s Great Recession. The root of that anxiety revolves around health care and retirement savings. Therefore, once our minds begin winding down for the day, we deny ourselves fluffy sheep in favor of counting our debts. We ponder about whether we’re covered for disasters and if we’re prepared enough for the future. Sounds about right, yeah?
The website also revealed 38% of those surveyed are concerned about health care and insurance bills in particular. In case you’re wondering why CreditCards.com would survey 1,000 americans about what makes them toss and turn at night?, James Chessen, chief economist at the American Bankers Association, summed it up.“Health care costs are one of the three major drivers of delinquencies in consumer credit,” he said. “For individuals who are living paycheck to paycheck, that’s one cough or accident away from creating a financial problem.”
Tuition hikes and student loan debt also accounted for a great amount of stress. "Thirty-four percent said they lose sleep over paying their educational expenses (or someone else’s), up from 30 percent in 2016 and 27 percent in 2009,” the study read.
Money keeping you up at night? While we may not be able to help with your health insurance costs or student loan debt, we do have a Guide To Great Sleep.
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