The Weeknd Saved His Locs — & You Won't Believe Where

Photo: Noam Galai/WireImage.
Update: The Weeknd may have chopped off his locs months ago, but it doesn’t mean they’re gone forever. In an interview with Zane Lowe on Beats 1 last week, the musician revealed that his hair actually lives on — in the safekeeping of his manager, Cash.

“The big question,” Lowe said. “Your hair. Did you keep it?”

“Yeah,” the singer replied, laughing. “It’s in Cash’s safe right now.”

The singer discussed the benefits of the cut: “It’s the greatest feeling of all time. I sleep better. I felt lighter. When I perform, I perform better. The best part about all of it is I get to wear caps again. Wear a fucking cap, walk into a restaurant, no one knows it’s you. It’s cool.”

So next time you think you see a dude in a baseball hat who looks like The Weeknd? Don’t brush it off — it could be him.

This story was originally published on November 3, 2016.

Last month, The Weeknd surprised us all when he chopped off his signature dreadlocks. The change sparked a series of questions — Could the cut be real? What does it mean? — that left all of us in quite the puddle of emotions. The hair gods, however, must have heard our queries, because the singer just answered.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, he explained that the style simply wasn't sustainable anymore. "I could only sleep on one side of my face," he said. "Now, the sleep is amazing. The shower is amazing, because I don’t have to spend two hours cleaning it. I didn’t know how much I wanted it until I did it.”

Of course, the reason why people were so shocked was because his spiked crop had been a staple throughout his entire career. You know, like how Ariana Grande has her ponytail and Gigi Hadid has her Cali-girl waves. That was another reason he wanted so badly to switch it up: The Weeknd didn't want his hair to be his trademark (fair).

“It was a long time coming,” he said. “It didn’t feel right anymore...I told everybody I was getting rid of it, and everybody — literally, unanimously — they were like, ‘No, don’t do it! That’s your whole thing, that’s you.’ And the way they said that, I was like, ‘Oh, I’m definitely cutting it now.’”
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