Here's What Really Separates Squirting From Female Ejaculation

Photographed by Kate Anglestein.
A version of this story originally appeared on Shape.

When it comes to female pleasure, there's enough misinformation out there to fill a book. One of the most widespread myths about women and sex has to do with the (wonderful and totally normal) plethora of fluids we may or may not release upon reaching orgasm. Luckily, Shape's resident sex expert, Dr. Logan Levkoff, set the record straight.

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To begin, all fluids are not created equal. "Though we often use these terms [ejaculation and squirting] interchangeably, they are not the same thing," Dr. Levkoff explained. Squirting refers "to that gush of fluid that comes out of the urethra," she said. Yes, squirting is technically mostly made of urine, as this 2015 study found. But as we've stated previously, it doesn't really matter what it's made of, and the experience of squirting with an orgasm is totally different than simply needing to pee during sex.

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Meanwhile, female ejaculate is thicker, milkier, and whiter than the fluid that comes out when you squirt. And, rather than exiting the urethra, ejaculate comes out of the Skene's glands, found inside the vagina. In terms of its appearance and makeup, Dr. Levkoff said that "it's pretty similar to semen, without the sperm."

Dr. Levkoff concluded with an important reminder: Whether you squirt, ejaculate, or do neither when you orgasm, "there is no such thing as being advanced at having an orgasm."

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