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Studio Stalker: Inside The Tricked-Out Suno Workshop

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    Never has "swoon" been a more appropriate word than in the context of Suno (and the alliteration helps too), the two-year-old label from designers Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty. Off-the-wall color, mind-tripping prints, and ecclectic Indian textiles make Suno's pieces one signature that always stands out from the pack. Plus, you can feel damn good about looking good; the brand's all about fostering sustainable development in Kenya, 70% of production takes place in the country and helps to nurture local artisans. So, you can imagine their Garment District studio has to be a space where even Peter Beard would take a moment of silence. And that it is—Max and Erin (who also happen to be pretty stunning themselves) opened up their office doors to take us on a private tour of their design digs, and our retinas are still reeling. From a first look at resort '12 (oh those patterns!) to their inspiration boards, not to mention four aww-worthy dogs, get ready to—pardon the cheese—swoon-o. 


    Click through to score a look at Suno's gorgeous studio with personal captions from Max and Erin, too!

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