This Is What "Sample-Size" Clothing Looks Like On The Average Woman

Photo: Courtesy of You Do You.
Until recently, the term "sample size" has been used in the fashion industry as a sort of placeholder, a coupling of words that are supposed to represent a "standard" for pieces made for the runway. But agender fashion site You Do You is here with an editorial that sheds light on how unrealistic the sizes are, how blind they are to the body diversity that is now beginning to be a part of the industry.

Fashion writer and Refinery29 contributor Liz Black modeled a selection of sample-size dresses to illustrate the struggle women — celebrity or not — face in fashion today; over 67% of women in the U.S. wear a size 14 and above, which is why shoots like this are helpful in visualizing just how exclusive and alienating the industry can feel.

"Having worked in the fashion industry for several years, I have spent time up close with both runway samples as well as the models who wear them, and the size difference between those garments and my 'average' body size has always been shocking," Black said of the experience. "I wanted to show that size dichotomy to shock the viewer, as well; seeing my fleshier form attempting to shove my way into these tiny samples (or in some cases, just draping it on my body) will cause the viewer to question why these garments are made so small."
Photo: Courtesy of You Do You.
Photo: Courtesy of You Do You.
Sure, the average American woman may not be accustomed to modeling high-fashion gowns in a photoshoot, or ordering ready-to-wear straight from the runway, but that's not the point. Instead, it's about the encouraging inclusivity that has crept in to the industry, which leaves us wondering who brands are really marketing to, and when are things going to change. Ahead, see some of the photos from the piece.
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Photo: Courtesy of You Do You.
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