What Would A Trump Impeachment Look Like? You'll See It On This TV Show

Photo: Patrick Harbron/CBS.
Pictured: Rose Leslie and Christine Baranski in The Good Fight.
Law & Order: SVU isn't the only TV show that has the "ripped from the headlines" approach down pat. Like its predecessor, The Good Wife, the CBS All Access spinoff The Good Fight often takes inspiration from current events: Trump's presidency, Bernie Madoff-style Ponzi schemes, and an alt-right antagonist modeled after Milo Yiannopoulos.
It's no surprise, then, that season 2 isn't pulling any punches with its provocative plots. As Deadline reports, the critically acclaimed legal drama will tackle the reporting of allegations of sexual harassment against Harvey Weinstein, and the potential impeachment of that stable genius in the White House, when it returns on March 4.
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Executive producer Robert King told the Television Critics Association (TCA) yesterday that one season 2 episode will see the predominantly Black, liberal-leaning firm of Reddick, Boseman, and Kolstad being approached by the Democratic National Committee to look into the legal case for impeaching Trump, provided the Democrats take the House in the mid-term elections.
Long story short: As thrilling as it'd be for Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) to take down POTUS, it won't be as easy as some of you might hope.
“A lot of it is a debate about how he could be impeached and also going into the 25th Amendment," King teased. “There’s a little bit of digging into the weeds on a lot of the legal issues surrounding impeachment, especially because [the DNC] are really counting their chickens before they hatch."
Another storyline is inspired by Ronan Farrow's coverage of the Weinstein allegations, which his onetime employer NBC News supposedly declined to publish. Farrow's reporting ultimately ended up in The New Yorker. Similarly, The Good Fight will focus on the legal drama spurred by a reporter's planned coverage of sexual harassment charges against a "liberal star."
We're eager to see how the show gives the past year's ugliest headlines a smart, sensitive, and nuanced spin. And, y'know: Baranski.
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