Taylor Swift's Reputation Won't Be Streaming — Right Away, At Least

Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images.
Fans hoping to find all the tea on Taylor Swift's Reputation as soon as the album drops will have to pay up.
According to Bloomberg, the follow up to 1989 won't hit streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music the same time the physical album hits stores. So unfortunately, anyone unwilling to pony up the extra cash to buy the album in full (whether that means on iTunes or via an actual real-life album) may have to wait a full week before it hits streaming services.
Bloomberg adds that the one-week window isn't clear, however. As Swift and her team negotiate terms with the individual services, it could take longer than expected, meaning the wait could be even longer. That means anyone unwilling to pay will be at least a week behind the news cycle, though it probably won't be difficult to catch snippets of the album by merely existing in the world today. The first four singles, "Look What You Made Me Do," "...Ready For It?," "Gorgeous," and "Call It What You Want" are all available to stream already.
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Vulture adds that Swift isn't exactly setting precedent by keeping Reputation off of the services. Frank Ocean and Chance the Rapper released their latest LPs on Apple Music and were exclusive to the streaming service for two weeks. Adele didn't have 25 available to stream for months after its debut and Beyoncé only has Lemonade on Tidal.
Swift, however, has been critical of streaming. Bloomberg notes that in an op-ed she wrote for the Wall Street Journal, she said that streaming "devalued music." Spotify has a free service, which has advertising, as well as a pay service, which has an expanded catalog and some exclusives. Apple Music only has a pay service. When she released 1989, Swift withheld it from streaming for eight months.
Fans will have to hope that the predicted week grace period is all it takes, because not having access to Reputation and all of its thinly veiled references could really do damage to someone's, er...reputation.
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