John Lewis Led A Civil Rights March Through Comic-Con

Step aside, Superman: John Lewis is here to show everyone that you don't need super-human strength or the ability to fly in order to be one of the world's greatest superheroes.
The Civil Rights leader and congressman from Georgia led an epic march through Comic-Con in San Diego, California, on Saturday, after he held a discussion about his graphic novel, March. According to The Hollywood Reporter, approximately 1,000 people, including schoolchildren, tagged along, chanting things like "No justice, no peace."
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March is a trilogy that documents Lewis's experience throughout the Civil Rights movement, touching on some of the most violent, heartbreaking, and influential moments from Bloody Sunday to President Lyndon B. Johnson's signing of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. The books were co-authored by Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell, who also attended the Comic-Con panel and march.
Lewis has continued his activism and commitment to nonviolent protest in the House of Representatives. One recent example was the sit-in he led with other members of Congress that called for their GOP colleagues to vote on life-saving gun-control measures.
Despite Lewis's incredible influence, The Hollywood Reporter noted that not everyone recognized him as he walked the streets surrounding the San Diego Convention Center. The people who did, however, made sure to thank him for his contributions to the United States.
Photo: Al Powers/AP
The Hollywood Reporter notes that Lewis encouraged the large panel audience, filled with both adults and young children, to fight for what they believe is right.
"Dr. King inspired me to get in trouble: What I call good trouble, necessary trouble," Lewis reportedly told the crowd. "Now more than ever before, we all need to get in trouble. When you see something that is not right, not fair, not just, you have a moral obligation, a mission and a mandate to stand up, to speak up, to speak out and get in trouble."
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