You Need To See These Baby Giant Pandas

Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
Move over, kittens and puppies. Fly away, tiny owl that recently won Twitter. Ten — count 'em! — baby pandas have made their public debut at a Chinese breeding center and the collective cuteness is almost too much to handle.

Just kidding. We can't get enough of these adorable fuzzballs.

More importantly, they're bona fide bundles of joy for conservation efforts to save the endangered species from extinction. According to the World Wildlife Fund, only 1,864 giant pandas live in the wild. China, the panda's homeland, has led the way with captive breeding to revive the population — though it hasn't been easy. Female pandas are fertile only two or three days out of the year and male pandas have a tendency to become sterile in captivity. Thanks to advancements in technology, breeding and panda cubs' survival rates have improved.

In fact, the chance of survival for these cubs is far better in the breeding center than in the wild, where panda moms selectively abandon their offspring between one week and two months after birth. This also bodes well for a newborn panda at the National Zoo, Time reports.

To celebrate, here's a baby panda party photo album.



1 of 6
Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
Which panda cub is the cutest? Trick question. That's impossible to determine.
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2 of 6
Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
With the exception of kangaroos and possums, pandas are the tiniest mammal babies relative to their mothers' size, Smithsonian National Zoo reports. Born hairless and about the size of a stick of butter, pandas go through a "Fuzzy Stick of Butter" development phase.
3 of 6
Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
Here's a fun fact for your next baby panda party. A group of pandas, which is rare to see in the wild considering their solitary nature, is called an embarrassment.
4 of 6
Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
Baby panda fangirl sporting a panda purse and pressed up as close as possible to the exhibit window: we feel you. Also, many of the breeding center's baby pandas have been coming in twos, the Daily Mail reports. In fact, there have been a record seven pairs of twins born there this year.
5 of 6
Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
Too young to crawl, the panda cubs get to hang out in baskets instead. Which is fortunate for us, otherwise we might've never learned that baby pandas are the cutest possible thing you can put in a wicker basket.
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Photo: Getty/ChinaFotoPress/Contributor
Ain't no party like a baby panda party...because a baby panda party is pretty much napping. When giant pandas grow up, they spend around half the day foraging and eating and the rest of their time snoozing.
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