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Volcom's First Shoe Line Is Just As Rad As Skateboarding But Less Risky

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    Perhaps you were that guy/gal in high school whose skateboard never left your side. Or maybe you were the type who preferred to doggie paddle instead of riding the waves. Whichever it is, skate and surf style is something that's much more universally friendly than skating or surfing as activities — and certainly doesn't require knee pads. And regardless of our know-how or ability (or lack thereof), Volcom has always been a brand we've turned to for laid-back and cool gear. Now the line will be branching out with the introduction of its first women's footwear line for fall '13.

    Naturally, you won't see any stilettos or frilly soles here, but cute kicks are certainly in no short supply. The first collection introduces sweet, color-blocked flats, perforated high-tops, and some classic strappy sandals that will hit the market in July and offer endless comfy, cool, go-to options for all your sunny adventures ahead. And priced between $45 and $120, it will make for the perfect complement to your weekend style without breaking the bank — or for those still determined to dominate a skate deck — a bone.

    Photo: Courtesy of Volcom

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