Watch: The Sappiest Love Speeches

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In our semi-expert opinions, anyone who claims not to take guilty pleasure in romantic comedies is simply kidding themselves. Sure, these movies aren't always the most groundbreaking, but they have taught our cold, black souls how to feel. Whether you're in the midst of a breakup, falling head over heels for a new love interest, or just need something to look at while you binge on cheesy breadsticks, rom-coms will always be there for you. We crave the predictability of the guy-meets-girl, guy-loses-girl, guy-gets-girl-back-with-unrealistically-romantic-gesture plot lines. We've also come to love the leading ladies and men like they were our own best friends (here's looking at you, Harry and Sally!). And, most importantly, we've memorized basically every single line.

Because the draw of any good rom-com is that defining moment in which a character wins over their soul mate, we decided to take a look at the very best proclamations of love. Or, more specifically, the very best according to us. There will be lots of slow-motion running, numerous building crescendos, and maybe even a few happy tears. Click through to see them all, and, as usual, let us know your favorite scenes in the comments.

Say Anything

Ahh, the love proclamation that needed no words, but only the gift of music. Lloyd Dobler's desperate boom-box "serenade" is the quintessential rom-com scene, and for good reason. Every time we hear Peter Gabriel's "In Your Eyes," we are overcome with emotion, and it's all thanks to John Cusack's adorable baby face.

Love Actually

Most fans gravitate toward Mark's heartbreaking doorstep confession, and while we admit that it's a good one, we're going to go out on a limb and say that Jamie's proposal to Aurelia is the best part of the movie. Is there anything more romantic than learning a new language just to ask the love of your life for her hand in marriage? Plus, we're suckers for "just in cases."

Can't Hardly Wait

In the ultimate guy-chases-girl flick, proclamations of love abound. But, our favorite comes with a hilarious twist. And, let's be honest, it's way more romantic than when Preston actually talks to Amanda.

Silver Linings Playbook

Gah! Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, you complete us. If we had it our way, they would star in every romantic comedy that ever existed. We'll cop to being reduced to a blubbery mess several times throughout this movie, but especially when Tiffany reads Pat's precious, childlike letter. Also, it should be noted that this scene contains quite possibly the least believable chase ever, but we're willing to overlook some things for "The only way you could meet my crazy was by doing something crazy yourself."

When Harry Met Sally

When you realize you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible. Have more romantic words ever been spoken? Billy Crystal isn't your typical eligible bachelor, but that's just what we love about Harry.

He's Just Not That Into You

Okay, we have to say it: We aren't totally crazy about Gigi. We know that's kind of the point, but we were still floored when we found ourselves tearing up when she finally finds love during the movie's closing scenes. It's probably because Justin Long is just that sweet and quirky.

My Best Friend's Wedding

We already know what you're going to say here: Julianne and Michael don't actually end up together. But, a proclamation of love doesn't have to be successful for it to be great. Sure, Julianne was stepping on a few toes by going after an engaged man, but we'd been waiting so dang long to see her confess her feelings to Michael. And, her tell-all leads up to one of the best rom-com chase scenes of all time.

10 Things I Hate About You

Heath Ledger, you were just too good to be true. In fact, this scene was so good that it set a remarkably high precedent for high-school relationships. Never again could a guy simply ask someone to prom or out for a burger — there had to be pomp, circumstance, and a marching band.

Notting Hill

Two years after My Best Friend's Wedding, Julia Roberts is a little bit more grown-up, her hair is a little bit flatter, but the sentiment is just the same. She may be an A-list celebrity (in the movie and IRL), but for right now, she's just a girl, standing in front of a boy, asking him to love her.



As Good As It Gets

There's a lot to be sad about in this movie: Each character's life is more tragic than the next, and whenever we rewatch we find ourselves thinking, "Can't a guy (or girl!) catch a break?" But, luckily, a happy ending can redeem even the biggest sob-fest, and Melvin's earnest speech does the trick.


Bridget Jones's Diary

It should be a hard-and-fast rule in Hollywood that whenever Colin Firth is involved, his character is always the right romantic choice. We're not really sure what took Bridget Jones so long to figure that out, especially after this adorable, sheepish little speech. We may want a lot of things in life, but when it comes down to it, all we're really hoping for is someone to like us just the way we are.



Brokeback Mountain

Jack and Ennis are completely in love, yet they can't just come right out and say it because, well, lots of things. Still, for an overly macho cowboy, "I wish I knew how to quit you" is about as emotional as it gets — and we love it.



Clueless

Falling in love with your sort-of-stepbrother has never been more adorable. Especially when that sort-of-stepbrother is a charmingly shy, bumbling, hot nerd like Josh. Even though it's been 13 years, we still blush every time we watch the baby-faced Paul Rudd try and get these words out.



Pride and Prejudice

It's the classic romantic predicament — the one guy you can't stand always turns out to be the one guy you can't live without. No matter how many times we read or watch Pride and Prejudice, we're always equally overjoyed when that impossible Mr. Darcy (Colin Firth, you rom-com champ!) proves himself to actually not be that impossible after all. Our thanks go out to Jane Austen for giving us an unhealthy obsession with 18th-century English men.