This Is How The 1% Does Tiny Houses

Photo: Jerritt Clark/Getty Images.
When we think of tiny homes, it may conjure up images of quaint cottages with the bare necessities, or even miniature abodes designed for a good cause — not the pricey residences that dot the Hamptons. Where would a miniature house even fit among the palatial pads and swimming pools? Perhaps in someone's sprawling, manicured backyard?

Enter, Cocoon9. The design team, based in New York and Shanghai, and co-founded by Edwin Mahoney and Christopher Burch, has devised a miniature home created to provide "a contemporary approach to sustainable luxury." They're currently offering three different versions of the diminutive dwellings. Click through to see what they're all about.
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Photo: Courtesy of Cocoon9.
“About four or five years ago, I started looking into this concept of really cool houses that you could manufacture quickly.... The goal was to create a thoughtfully designed product that is simple and elegant, and can be used for many different functionalities," Burch told The New York Times. Order a house, and you can get it delivered worldwide in around 16 weeks.
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Photo: Courtesy of Cocoon9.
The company has three models: Cocoon Cabin, Cocoon Studio, and Cocoon Lite 20. The first two models measure in at 480 square feet, and the Lite 20 model is a shockingly tiny 160 square feet. All three units boast floor-to-ceiling windows and are "equipped to accommodate sustainable features such as solar panels and roof gardens."
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Photo: Courtesy of Cocoon9.
The appliances, furniture, and storage units that come with the one-bedroom homes can be folded into the walls to fit a high volume of guests, impromptu dance parties, yoga sessions, what have you. The Cabin style, in particular, reminds us a bit of Philip Johnson's Glass House.
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Photo: Courtesy of Cocoon9.
The Studio and Cabin models begin at $225,000, but can cost upward of $245,000 for premium designs. A potential buyer must also take into consideration the costs of purchasing a base for the unit, permits, utilities, a crane, and shipping, all of which may add up to an extra $85,000, according to the Times.
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Photo: Courtesy of Cocoon9.
The floor plan of the Cocoon Studio.
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