How To Stack Your Rings Like A Pro

Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
Stacking your rings is one of those things that seems easy — you're literally just putting on your own jewelry — but, once you get going, you realize it takes some artistry to make it look good, and not haphazard. When our friend Amanda Thomas sent over a sneak peek of her new fall Luv Aj lookbook, with perfectly-accessorized fingers on every page, we knew we had to get the inside scoop on how she styled the shoot.

"The secret is in the editing," Thomas told us. "It can look a bit goofy if you have one too many rings on and they all run into each other. I mean, it’s easy to layer a stack of dainty rings, but when your mixing metals, or experimenting with different weights or thicknesses, it can get a bit more tricky. There is definitely an art to layering!" Naturally, we immediately asked her for all her tips and tricks.

Ahead, you'll find Thomas' advice for pulling off a hand full of rings that only looks like it's been styled by a L.A.-favorite jewelry designer. Oh, and you may want to add a few pieces from the collection to your own ring party. (Budgets beware: They're all dope and available now...)



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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"The key to rocking a ring on every finger definitely has a few factors to it. You want to play with the thickness of all the rings — some dainty and some chunkier. You also want to mix up the the height. Some rings can be simple bands, and some can have a tall, or wide, element to it to add some interest."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"I tend to prefer doubling up on rings on the center of the hand; keep two rings on one finger isolated to the middle, ring, and pointer fingers. I also like layering them side by side, I just think a clustered moment works."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"If you’re going to rock a hand piece, keep the stacking to a minimum — maybe a few dainty rings around the middle finger, or perhaps one really dope cocktail ring to accent it. I think the thinner the hand piece, the more crazy you can go with adding rings and bracelets. If it's a statement hand piece, I say let it do it’s thing."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"I like taking two rings and stacking them together, so they almost seem like they were made as one ring. The Coil Band in Gold and Silver layered together look like a match made in heaven. When it comes to mixing plating or textures, I say stick to two maximum. Maybe a shiny gold and oxidized silver [like here], or a matte and shiny rose gold. Too many finishes can be distracting."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"I love the idea of doing one hand all silver and one hand all gold. The look works because it has symmetry, seeing as all the jewelry is the same on each hand, but the clashing metals makes it feel really unique."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"I love a symmetrical moment, so if I design a ring, I’ll usually design a bracelet for it as well. I think there’s something really chic about wearing a set of jewelry, it seems really curated and clean."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"When it comes to midi rings, it’s important to make sure they fit! They have a tendency to fly off your hands mid-conversation or mid-dance, if they’re too loose. Most girls are between a size 2-3.5 for knuckle rings — try to find some that fit well, so you don’t loose them in the wild. The Ball Chain Ring Set is one of my favorite pieces from our fall line because there are literally 100 ways you can wear them. We mixed a larger and smaller ball chain, and a variety of ring sizes in the pack, so you can truly make these your own."
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Photo: Courtesy of Amanda Thomas.
"Like I mentioned before, I love me some symmetry. A matching bangle and ring, or a matching regular ring and midi ring [like seen here]. Playing with size and scale, with the same charm or motif, can look really visually interesting together; that’s why I love doing ring sets so much.
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