The Only 4 Hairstyles You Need This Winter

We’re not going to lie: Last year’s winter was terrifying. There was boiling water turning into instant snow, anamorphic snowmen singing, and this poor L.A.-born-and-raised writer learning how dreadful a windchill could really be. With the polar vortex and its inevitable doom fast approaching, you need not just weatherproof your wardrobe but your hair as well. And, that’s why we’re anxiously proactively planning the styles that’ll ward off any and every hair ailment in the face of even the worst weather forecasts.
We reached out to hairstylist extraordinaire, Adam Maclay, for the best hairstyles that’ll not only look amazing in the threat of frizz, static, and general dishevelment, but are easy enough to whip together on your own with a few Pantene essentials, too. From the braid that won’t make you look like a drenched sewer rat when caught in flash-flood conditions to the adorable pouf that promises to keep your hair in place during a windstorm, these are the easy styles that’ll help you looking kempt and prepared for anything.
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So, while your skin may be chapped, your lips cracked, and your rain boots filled with icy slush, we promise you this: Your hair will look amazing.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Weather Forecast: Rain
Hair Problem: Frizz

When it’s wet and humid out, painstakingly curling your hair and achieving the perfect pouf are all for naught the second your umbrella flips. Instead of curls, you end up walking into work with damp, flattened roots and smelling like the subway. Rather than leaving your hair down and at the whims of the elements, try a frizz-warding braid like the one here, which will retain its shape and style even when it’s pouring out.

Terra New York coat.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Section away the center of your hair, from the top of your eyebrow arch to the crown and back to your other eyebrow arch, creating the shape of a horseshoe.

Ann Taylor romper.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Pull back the remaining hair into a bun at the nape of your neck. Just twist and pin — doesn’t get easier than that.

Kelly Wearstler rings.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
All right, now’s the time to flex your plaiting skills. Release the front part of your hair, and section it into three equal parts to start a reverse French braid.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
A reverse French is just like a French braid where you pull in pieces of hair as you go, but instead of going over each piece, you’re going to take each section under the other so that the braid ends up raised, sitting on top of your head, like you see here.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Once completed, tie the ends with an elastic, and then pull apart the braid to flatten it out.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
This last step is easy: Wrap the finished braid around the bun and pin into place.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
If you deal with frizz, Maclay says braiding all your hair into a thick plait lets your natural texture shine through and doesn’t crumble at the sight of some rain.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Weather Forecast: Wind Storm
Hair Problem: Tangled, Split Ends

Fierce, bone-chilling winds can suck the moisture out of your hair, leaving you with dry ends that are more prone to snapping and tangling. For a style that will stay put in the wind — while protecting your hydrated ends — try this hair-raising pouf.

Joe Fresh coat, DKNY cardigan, Joseph shirt, Express skirt, Express necklace and ring.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
All hair loses moisture in the winter, but it's especially an issue for natural hair, so it’s important to hydrate your hair every day and before every style. Apply a leave-in conditioner to damp hair, or choose a styling cream with hydrating properties, like Pantene Truly Natural Defining Curls Custard. Work in your product of choice from the mid-shaft to the ends of your hair.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Section away the front center of your hair, from temple to temple.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Gather the rest of your hair, and twist it into a chignon. Starting from the nape of your neck, twist the hair onto its side, and tuck in the ends, pinning as you go.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Tease the back section of the front hair and pin into a small pouf.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
When it comes to taking care of your hair in the winter, your main prerogative is to keep it hydrated. With this look, your hydrated ends are tucked in and out of sight, while the rest of your hair will stay in place no matter how fierce the wind gusts.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Weather Forecast: Heat
Hair Problem: Dry, Brittle Hair

The weather forecast might say it’s cold and stormy out, but the temperature inside your office (and your hole of a room) is hot, hot, hot. The sudden change in temperature only dries out your hair more, leaving you with frizzy — and sweaty — locks. To keep your hair off your neck for a day spent indoors, try this side swoop.

Comptoir Des Cotonniers coat, Band of Outsiders sweater and skirt, Kelly Wearstler necklace and ring.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
First, curl your front section of hair around a one-inch curling iron, wrapping away from your face. This will help your hair sit up on top of your head and not against your sweaty forehead.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
This is the easy part: Place bobby pins along the perimeter of your crown, from ear to ear, to dictate the shape that you want.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Starting from the left side of your hair, take a one-inch section of hair, and roll it up around the bobby pins, tucking in the ends. Pin in the ends with a vertically placed bobby pin. You want the bobby pin to hook into the horizontally placed pin from before — this locks them together and helps keep your 'do intact.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Continue working in one-inch sections across your head until you reach your curled fringe. Twist those ends into the existing roll, as well.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
The messier this looks, the better, so don’t worry about perfecting the roll or pinning in equal sections. If you have any shorter layers, twist them up into the roll and pin, or let them fall and frame your face.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Weather Forecast: Snow
Hair Problem: Static

The dry air in the winter leads to more static electricity; factor in the beanies you're always pulling on and off, and your hair doesn’t stand a chance against static. Making sure your locks are moisturized helps, but for a style that’ll keep static at bay, Maclay recommends a twisted ponytail, which looks chic peeking out from under a beanie or on its own.

Ann Taylor coat, Ann Taylor sweater, Pure DKNY pants, Express earrings, Express necklace, and Express ring.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
For this style, smoothness is key, so prep damp hair with a detangling spray, and comb it through. Try Pantene Daily Moisture Renewal Moisture Mist Detangler.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Make a center part from the hairline to the nape of your neck. Twist each section towards the center part and secure with a rubber band. While twisting, use a mattifying wax to keep any flyaways intact as you make your way down.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Twist the two ropes together until you reach the ends.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
Secure with a clear elastic.
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Photographed by Zoltan Tombor.
No braiding skills or even bun skills required — just some ol’ fashioned twisting for a simple but pretty look anyone can do.
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