Throwing A Party? These 3 Flower DIYs Will Take Your Soiree To The Next Level

Throwing a party? Whether it's a tea for two or a full-blown dinner party extravaganza make sure you don't forget the flowers. A floral arrangement is the easy-win finishing touch to every soiree. And, it's not tricky to recreate yourself. Really.
All it takes are some cool receptacles (think: thrift store vases), in-season flowers, a teensy bit of patience, and the step-by-step instructions from London florist Sarah Cooper-White of Poppies & Peonies. Throwing a tea party? An antique rose bouquet is just the thing. Having your friends over for cocktails on Friday? No problem, a gorgeous floral display makes the perfect centre piece to your chips and dips. We guarantee you'll never go without a flower in your apartment again.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
Cocktail party centre piece

Throwing a cocktail party at yours this holiday season? A hand-tied bunch of flowers makes the perfect centre piece to show off all your chips, dips, and sips. And, the best part? It is really easy to assemble. Promise.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
All you need is a receptacle for the flowers (in this case a thrift store-bought lemonade jug), twine, scissors, green foliage, and a mix of coloured flowers that suit your party’s theme.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
1. First of all you need to clean the flowers’ stems. This means the stems have to be devoid of all leaves and thorns from the point of where you are holding them downwards. No leaves should touch the water in the jug as they rot and make the water murky and smelly.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
2. Start by grouping a central mix of your green foliage together. Hold the flowers in the hand you don’t write with. Use the hand that you do write with to assemble the bouquet. It is your strongest hand and you will need your most dexterous hand to assemble the bouquet.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
3. Once you are happy with the central mix of green foliage, you need to “spiral” the bouquet with your coloured flowers. This means you have to rotate the arrangement clockwise and each time you do so, place a flower in the centre of the arrangement. This allows the flowers to be evenly distributed throughout the arrangement.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
4. When you are satisfied with how the colours in the arrangement have been distributed, you need to tie the bouquet in place. You can use any type of string or blind wire. Put your thumb over the wire and tie it around the arrangement a couple of times until it feels secure. Then double knot to make it extra secure.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
5. Next step is cutting down the flowers’ stems. To give the arrangement a natural finish, the flowers need to look as if they are falling over the lip of the vase.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
6. Place the flowers in the vase and cut to size if necessary. Pull down flowers and cut off leaves if you still aren’t happy with the overall shape of the flowers.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
Dinner party talking point

If you are hosting a dinner party for Thanksgiving or any other occasion this holiday season, don’t forget to dress the table with an arrangement that inspires oohs and ahhs from your guests. This floral centrepiece takes 15 minutes to arrange and should last for over two weeks — meaning your decoration for the party season is pretty much covered.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
Before you start, make sure you have a vase in the size your prefer, some oasis to place the flowers in, green foliage like eucalyptus, “filler” flowers or small white flowers, and brightly-coloured flowers of your choice. In this case berries and red roses.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
1. The first step is to cut the oasis down to size to fit inside the vase. Cut the edges to give it a better shape. Once you’ve cut it gently push it down into the container. Make sure it is a tight fit. Only have a small vase? The oasis can create a bigger circumference for your flowers to be placed in, leading to a larger floral arrangement.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
2. Next you need to “green up” your arrangement. Use the foliage to completely cover up the oasis. Place the foliage at random points around the oasis to get a good shape in which to arrange the rest of the flowers.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
3. Add your filler flowers. These are small, delicate white flowers that act to lighten the arrangement and break up the greenery in the bouquet. Dot the flowers all around the arrangement as you see fit.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
Add the white flowers at random intervals around the arrangement.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
4. Create focal points with your statement coloured flowers. Try grouping your roses together and remember to use odd numbered arrangements – it looks far more pleasing to the eye.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
You can make this arrangement a couple of days before your party to avoid last minute stresses.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
Afternoon tea for two or more…

What is lovelier than an afternoon tea party with all the trimmings? Give Downton a run for its money by whipping up a floral display that oozes old-world charm and sophistication.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
All you’ll need is a mini vase or a bowl (we’ve chosen this gorgeous vintage swan vase), a selection of roses in various shades of pinks, blushes, creams, and mauves, a pair of scissors, and some chicken wire.

Top tip: When choosing roses, make sure they are tightly budded and firm to the touch. Once bought, place in your vase with lots of fresh water for a couple of days before you want to work on the bouquet. The flowers will soften and open up, which will make the bouquet far more attractive.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
1. Prep your roses by stripping all the stems of thorns and leaves. Cut the chicken wire into small squares and mold to fit inside the vase. It is useful to apply two layers of chicken wire inside the vase as it gives the stems more of a frame to cling to. Once secured, pour water inside the vase.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
2. It’s time to choose the roses for the display. The colours of the roses don’t need to match. The beauty lies in clashing the colours together. Have fun grouping the flowers in your hands before you decide which flowers make the cut.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
3. Cut the flowers down to size. Use the side of the vase as a measure for how long the flowers need to be. Don’t worry if you do cut them too short. As long as the stem tips reach the water they should be fine. The chicken wire will support them in the arrangement.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
4. Place the flowers inside the vase as you cut them to see how the arrangement takes shape within the vase. Play around with the shape by removing flowers and adding them to a different area of the vase. Make sure colours are evenly distributed.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
5. Once all the flowers have been added to the vase check to see if there are any gaps in the arrangement. You shouldn’t be able to see the chicken wire at all. Don’t be afraid to remove bruised petals, too.
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Photographed by Lucy Lu.
This arrangement should last for a week. If one rose fades all you have to do is gently pull out and replace.
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