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29 Lies Fashion Magazines Have Told You

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    For an industry that thrives on creativity, individuality, and self-expression, fashion sure has a lot of restrictions. More often than not, having "style" is about knowing what you can and cannot wear for your figure, your age, and your social circles. And for however dusty those fashion "dos" and "don’ts" are in glossy magazines — these so-called "truths" somehow still manage to infect our minds when we're getting dressed in the morning. You really thought you could get away with that? Stripes make you look wide — did you forget?

    But if what's going on in fashion these days is any indication, people are starting to wake up, and break out: Labels like Hood by Air and Gucci have changed the rules about what constitutes men's and women's clothing on their catwalks, and models like Tess Holliday are redefining what it means to be conventionally attractive, as well as a fashion icon. There are 23-year-old entrepreneurs changing the way we dress, and ignoring all the rules about who gets to "make it." On a much smaller scale, the fashion magazine maxims that you used to look toward to for guidance are more confidence-depleting than they are invigorating. If your outfits don't make you excited to go out into the world and have a really kick-ass day (much less live a full, satisfying life), then it's time to let those old ideas go.

    Want to knock a few of them out of your mind? Join us, as we take down 29 of the most outdated lies the fashion industry has ever told you.

    For more ways to F*ck The Fashion Rules, click here.


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    Clothes that cost more are better.
    Despite what the industry wants us to believe, a higher price tag doesn’t always equal higher quality — and vice versa. Some fast fashion brands have worked to improve their quality so affordable pieces can last longer, and are less wasteful to both your wallet, and the environment. There are also indie designers out there who've figured out how to create beautiful, unique clothing for a fraction of luxury costs. This is much more valuable than any arbitrarily expensive it-item.

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    Always dress for your body type.
    It should be obvious by now that female proportions don’t always fit nicely into the food-shaped categories created by fashion magazines. Rather than finding your next outfit using a generic “body type” approach, we've learned that the pieces we love most in our closet celebrate what we love about ourselves, instead of hiding what we don't.

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    You can’t wear certain outfits after a certain age.
    The fact that Joan Didion, Cher, and Joni Mitchell all booked designer ad campaigns this season shows fashion is finally acknowledging that older women are interested in clothes, too. Now that the industry is finally getting on board with the fact that women of all ages like to shop, it’s time to set the record straight: Clothes don't have a “wear-by” date. Just take it from Marc Jacobs himself, who said of his wide-spanning customer base: “‘Real’ women are the reason the fashion industry exists. I am thrilled every time I see a woman on the street wearing [Marc Jacobs]… The way women choose to wear [Marc] is the way to wear it, because the clothes belong to them, their lives, [and] their vision.”

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    Men’s clothes are for men.
    Androgyny is a fashion buzzword these days, and cameos by female models might be one of menswear’s biggest runway trends. But we’ve long been advocates of ignoring which section we're currently in when shopping. It’s no secret that menswear — such as ties, suits, or any other clothing traditionally restricted to dudes — looks just as good on the ladies. Take a cue from Diane Keaton — stop borrowing from the boys, and own it yourself.

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    Looking taller is the goal.
    It used to be that runway models were all above 5'11", and the reigning heel philosophy was “the higher, the better.” But these days, fashion stars come in all heights (like Cara Delevingne, who walks the runway at 5'8"), and flats (even for fancy occasions), are just as normal as heels. Plus, there are certain silhouettes we love that don't do anything to make our legs look longer or our bodies more willowy. Believe us — we relish every opportunity to respond to anyone who tells us our sack dresses make us look squat by saying, "Thank you! I think so, too!"