3 Easy, Gorgeous Updos From Hollywood's Fave Hairstylist

Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
One could easily argue that Adir Abergel is the most in-demand red carpet hairstylist working today. He gives waves to Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, sleek crops to Rooney Mara, and messy texture to Reese Witherspoon on the regular — but, his updos are what really wow.

We're talking about the kind of technique and creative prowess that have been around the world and back: to Johnny Depp's private island with Amber Heard for their hush-hush wedding to countless press tours for Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Garner, and Jessica Biel. Luckily for us, he took a break from those chignons, braids, and low knots, to visit our L.A. offices, located a few blocks from where he grew up in Hollywood.

Just for us, Abergel created three wildly different updos — from romantic and voluminous, to modern and sleek. And they all have one thing in common: They're surprisingly easy. Click ahead and prepare to dive into these three 'dos.

Want a beauty bonus? Our model's glowing complexion came courtesy of celeb makeup artist Carissa Ferreri, and her clever mixture of Make Up For Ever Ultra HD Foundation, Tom Ford's Shade and Illuminate, and Laura Mercier's Stick Face Color in Coral Glow, blended with a BeautyBlender. And those bright eyes? That's Josie Maran's Coconut Watercolor Eyeshadow in Playa Del Pink smudged directly on the lid.


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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Look 1: The Victory Twists
"This is a modern take on the victory rolls from the '50s," Abergel says. "But, a little more rock 'n' roll, because this updo is a little deconstructed and the height is uneven." Translation: by adding messy texture, you can take a twist from prissy to edgy. Bonus: it looks amazing on dirty hair.

Alanna is wearing a Forever 21 crop top.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
As you'll notice, our model Alanna has an enviable head of natural curls. Abergel defined any unruly sections with a 1/2-inch iron and let them fully cool (very important) before beginning. If your hair is straight, simply curl small sections of hair using a 1/2 to 3/4-inch iron. (Yes, it will take a while, but it will be worth it.)

To begin, tease the roots of hair with a fine-tooth comb for grip and finger comb the curls until they're full and slightly fluffy. This will allow the style to stay in place and give you flexibility in crafting your pompadour.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Create a deep side part and evenly fan the curls over your shoulders. Working with the hair on the fuller side of the part, twist it back and up, keeping the top voluminous, and the side taut.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Continue to twist, adding sections of hair in the same way that you would pick up chunks if you were French braiding. Keep twisting until you have collected all the hair except the very front section on the opposite side. (Again, it doesn't need to be exact, just eyeball it!)
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Now you should have one side completely sectioned off, and the top should be loose with the sides and bottom tight.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Keep twisting upward until the length starts to coil in on itself.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Keep twisting until the length of the hair has created one giant lopsided twist against the scalp, then tuck the ends into the inner seam of the roll and gently mold the shape, like you see here. Insert bobby pins along the inner seam to hold it all in place. "My secret is that I spray my bobby pins with hairspray — always," Abergel says. "It mattifies them and keeps them in place."
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Take the remainder of the hair on the other side of the part and repeat the process on the other side, keeping this section closer to the scalp; there's no need to add volume on the smaller side.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Since you're working with less hair here, this second coil will be less full, so it's best to shape it with your fingers before tucking it under. To do so, wrap the twisted hair around two fingers, keeping it a few inches away from the scalp. Once you've created a little knot (like left) roll it into the seam of the original twist at the crown, the same place where you tucked the ends under.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Once all the hair is up, you can loosen as needed, or add pins to lock your final style into place. "The secret to these rolls is after you do them, you can go in and make them a little higher, tuck some more hair in, or just play with the shape until you like it," Abergel says.
"With a look like this, practice makes perfect."
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Presto! A perfectly-imperfect double twist with volume and texture. Next up is something with a touch of romance.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Look 2: The Half Lob
"This is a faux long bob that has a severity on one side," Abergel says. "This look is all about playing with the duality of textures."

Alanna is wearing a Forever 21 maxi-dress.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
To begin, either define or create small, tight curls with an iron, like instructed on slide two. Once you have your texture, spritz only the roots with a volumizer — Abergel used Kusco-Murphy Setting Lotion — and lift upwards with your fingers while blasting with a blow dryer. "When you’re creating your texture, it's important to get a lot of lift at the root, because you want those curls to cascade," Abergel says. Then, apply a lightweight oil from the mid-lengths to ends — Abergel used PAI Shau Biphasic Infusion Rejuvenating Concentrate for Hair — to tame any flyaways without weighing hair down. "You want the curls to be fluffy, not crunchy," he says.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Once the hair is looking full and volumized at the roots, sweep it all to one side and wind the ends up with your fingers. Once you're to the shoulders, secure into a small knot with an elastic. (The elastic will help anchor the knot to the scalp later.) Be sure to leave enough length so the bob is still long once it's tucked under.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Twist the little knot you just created under until you have the desired length in the front. Adjust as needed to shorten or lengthen the 'bob,' then pin it to the scalp with bobby pins.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Naturally, there's a trick to locking this shape in place: Drive a pin through the knot and into the scalp, then insert a second one to do the same, crisscrossing over the first pin. This crisscross method will limit the pins you need to use and keep them in place longer. And, don't forget to spray them with hairspray first!
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Gently loosen a few face-framing sections and define them with a ½-inch curling iron.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
That's it! The faux bob made easy. Next up is something sleek and modern.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Look 3: The Superhero Pony
"This last one should be called the superhero pony," Abergel says. "It's all about strong lines and architecture, with a high sheen."

Alanna is wearing an Armani Exchange tank top.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Our final look requires super sleek texture, so even straight hair can benefit from flat ironing. "Make sure you've conditioned your hair really well, and that it's super smooth before flat ironing it," Abergel says. After flat ironing, use a flat toothbrush to dispense a dab of Abergel's favorite gel along the hairline and over any breakage or flyaways. "It's called Gorilla Snot," Abergel says. "It's this cheap gel from the drugstore, but it's the best, it's the only one I will use on Rooney [Mara]; it's flexible and it doesn't flake. It's the best way to get those edges really nice and flat."
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Once you have a smooth hairline, create a sharp part from the top of one ear to the other, going over the crown. Pull all the hair from the hairline to that point into a ponytail and secure with a small, clear elastic.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Make a second part, this one running from the top of one ear to another. Grabbing all the hair in that section, secure with a second clear elastic. Then, tie the final section. But, don't forget: you need a sharp part. "It’s about dividing the hair in a way to see skin," Abergel says. At this point, you should have three separate ponytails.

Tip: To keep it looking uniform, make sure that each section is secured just above the parting line.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
"Then you just connect them all together," Abergel says. The first goes into the second, with a new elastic laying directly over the original elastic. Then, it feeds over the third elastic, with a new elastic combining the new section over the original elastic.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
Continue sectioning the hair down the length, wrapping the elastics neatly and evenly. To finish, lightly spritz hair with shine spray — Abergel opted for Oribe's Shine Light Reflecting Spray.
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Photographed by Kimberly Genevieve.
And, you're done. Now, which to try first...
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