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Creatures Of Comfort Delivers An Idyllic, Island-Inspired Spring '14

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    For Creatures of Comfort's latest collection, founder and designer Jade Lai fashioned an indigo-stained love note to the beautiful islands of the Mediterranean. Set against a beach-like backdrop of turquoise waves and sandy rocks, Lai's spring '14 designs of breezy, everyday wares have us dreaming of island-hopping and sun-basking — a little treat for those who finally had to succumb to breaking out the tights this week.

    The silhouettes are simple, loose-fitting, and free of unneeded embellishments. Chambray two-pieces, shirtdress tunics, drawstring jackets, and relaxed trousers build the beginnings of the collection, with surprising cameos from gold-foil shorts and statement-making, wide-brim hats. Aside from a few sea-foam pieces and a textured, yellow skirt, the color palette is pretty tame, sticking closely to neutrals and indigo. At this point, all we want to do is slip into a cool, spring creation from Creatures of Comfort and jet off to Corsica. And, trust, a flip through the clean, beautiful lookbook ahead will probably leave you with the same sentiment.

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