Christina Beckles Saves Abandoned Dogs — And Packs A Punch

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Christina Beckles, Founder and President of The Sato Project

This marketing expert (and former boxer!) has always been especially sensitive to the plight of animals — particularly dogs. Visiting her stuntman husband on location in Puerto Rico, she saw droves of neglected dogs and, instead of relaxing, spent the entire vacation feeding and caring for strays. Following that, Beckles felt compelled to get more involved and offered her services to rescue groups, donating and raising awareness for them. However, in 2009, after reading about Dead Dog Beach (a well-known Puerto Rican dumping ground for abused canines), she instantly knew her calling was clear: She quit her lucrative consulting job and started rescuing full time.

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Hands down, best professional advice you ever got.
“Do what you are most passionate about and follow your heart.”

“Technology of choice OR your Working Girl Essentials?
“Facebook has been an incredible tool for raising awareness. My iPhone and MacBook are indispensable for posting pictures and updates.”

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What’s your favorite thing to wear to work?
“I have to be as practical as possible when rescuing. I live in tank tops (Alexander Wang is a favorite), cut-off denim shorts, and combat boots (I’m dreaming about the Olivier Theyskens for Theory combat boots). I always wear a hat to combat sunburn — usually bought in Puerto Rico.”

What skill or habit do you think is vital for success?
"I take huge inspiration from my boxing career. I get hit and I keep on coming. I block it and unlock it. Sometimes I need to take a knee. I know that my rescue mission in Puerto Rico is the equivalent of a 15-round fight, and I am only on the first round. However, I know I have the stamina and determination to win the title."

What moments on the job do you find most rewarding?
“Any day we rescue a dog is a good day. Winning the trust of an abused dog is incredible, and sometimes it can take months. When they finally allow you to touch them and you see the relief on their faces when you caress with a loving hand, it’s priceless, and always keeps me going back for the next one.”

Photographed by Sunny Shokrae


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