Brooklyn's Best New Designers

Though the city is gearing up for the whirlwind of style and celebrity that is New York Fashion Week, we want to remind Manhattan that great fashion doesn't belong to that borough alone. Before we OD on Alexander and the ladies Mulleavy, Zac and Marc, Rag & Bone or RL, we've scoured Brooklyn for the next great Proenza; those ingenues with that special vision that'll have us coveting a front-row seat in just a few seasons. Sure, hype-generating Manhattanites will always pump the city's heartbeat, but here are a handful of seamsters from across the East River on the verge of being the Next Big Thing. You saw them here first!
R29 GIVEAWAY:
Just in time for NYFW, we're giving away the ultimate BK prize. One lucky winner could nab a Leila Shams one shouldered dress, a Mina Stone Maria Dress in sand (with the black paint splotch; size 4 only), and two tickets to Suzanne Rae's Lincoln Center show! To score the prize, like this post on our Facebook page. When we get to 2,000 likes, we'll randomly pick a winner. Good luck!
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Mina Stone

Mina Stone's super-femme hand-dyed silks and dresses practically embody spring, with Easter egg colors like cornflower blue or pale yellow. The designer turns to her Greek heritage when it comes to folding and pleating, giving full-bodied skirts high, Goddess-style waists. Fans of her leisurely jumpsuits and billowy dresses can pick up her day-to-night style at tastemakers like Steven Alan and Stuart & Wright.
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Mina Stone
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Mina Stone
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Leila Shams

Remember that killer owl dress Ke$ha wore that looked like a less nightmarish version of Chris Kane? That was Leila Shams. Her spring "Super Freak" collection is cheekily graphic, with enlarged images of horses or albino alligators, printed on maxi dresses, or mesh bodycon shifts. The classic shapes Shams plays with are punked out with the absurd—a trait Joe Zee struggled with on "All On The Line." Oh well; we dig her gutsiness, and so does NYFW, where Shams will be showing.

Available online in February, contact leila@leilashams.com for more ordering.
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Leila Shams
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Leila Shams
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Friends With Benefits

Friends With Benefits founder Clark Sabbat says none of his knits are sketched, but instead draped spontaneously. "I grab a piece of fabric and I let the fabric dictate how the garment should end up," he says. "The fabric is the pen and the dress form is the paper." The effortless, fluid quality shows in his modal jersey creations, which are both loose-fitting and sexy. A Grecian dress gets a tousled twist, the effortless Eliza frock is made out of jersey with flirty tulle sleeves. Nothing is symmetrical, but Sabbat's relaxed basics prove that nothing beats black and white.

Available by contacting the brand at info@friendswithbenefitslifestyle.com.
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Friends With Benefits
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Friends With Benefits
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Suzanne Rae

An alum of the gallery scene, Costume National and Morgane Le Fay, Suzanne Rae Paleaz came out swinging (delicately, of course) for her third solo collection. Like many of spring's travelogue-inspired designers (Alice and Olivia? Twenty8Twelve?), Paleaz looked toward Kerouac for On The Road cues. Filled with lush desert tones paired with pops of ochre and magenta, she envisioned garments both sensual and classic. The designer tapped female artists to create simple prints, popping out under skirts or emblazoned on a to-die-for poncho. Her western vision worked, and Suzanne Rae will present in Lincoln Center this go-around.

Available at Steven Alan, 103 Franklin Street (At Sixth Avenue), 212-219-3305.
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Suzanne Rae
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Suzanne Rae
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The Twentyten

A part of the sustainable Pratt Design Incubator Program, trio Jeff Dodd, David J. Krause, and Nina Zilka started designing clothing their sophomore year of school, and have continued post-graduation. The conceptual and geometric line has both mens and womenswear, but leans heavily towards the gals. The exaggerated shape of the high-waisted knit trousers nail slouchy wide legs and the splatter-paint dresses are dead on for technicolored spring. Keep your ear to the ground: The Twentyten place their quirky stamp on NYFW next week.

Available online in February, or at International Playground, 14 Stanton Street (between Bowery and Chrystie Street), 212-228-2700.
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the twentyten
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the twentyten
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