4 DIY Collars Anyone Can Whip Up!

It all started with Miu Miu (or our grandmothers, depending on who you ask), but detachable collars have really dominated the neck game for the past few seasons. Maybe it's the crisp lines or the sheer versatility, but there's nothing quite like a bit of buttoned-up bling at your neck to dress up an outfit. The one caveat? Shelling out the cash for a designer version can be a touch daunting. That's why we've put our crafty skills to task to create four DIY collars that anyone can create, if you've got a moment (and a few old button-ups) to spare. Click through for these crazy clever how-tos and whip up the whole quartet!
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Ahead, we'll show you how to make each one!
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Studs — Don't be psyched out by all these studs! They're not hard to put on, and your effort will be rewarded with a shirt that looks 10 times more expensive than it did before.

Photographed by Shanita Sims
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You'll need:
A button-down shirt with a collar. The shirt doesn't have to be plain, solid color, but we loved the contrast between the metal studs and the crispness of the white shirt.

Metal studs - You can often find them at trimming stores, or online Make sure you get the kind of studs that have metal spikes on the ends that can be folder over with pliers. 

Needle-nose pliers

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Step 1 — First, place the point ends of a stud into the topmost portion of the collar, right parallel to the inside stitching. Make sure all of the points go through the fabric and come out on the other side.

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Step 2 — Flip the collar over. Holding the stud in place with one hand, take a pair of pliers and begin to fold down the studs' spikes, making them flat and flush agains the fabric. You don't want to be poked later on!

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Step 3 — Place another stud on the bottom point of the collar, again, lined up with the inside stitching. Repeat step 3, making sure the stud is secured and all of the points lay flat.

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Step 4 — Place a third stud in between the first to, making a neat, straight column of three studs. Make sure this middle stud is equally spaced between the first two. Repeat step 3 to attach the stud.

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Step 5 — Now, we'll create a line of studs right next to the one we must made. If you feel confident in your studding skills at this point, you can place all three at once and then flip the collar over, to secure them all at the same time. Of, go ahead and place and secure one stud at a time, if you find it easier. Make sure you keep the spacing between the studs and the rows consistent.

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Step 6 — Repeat steps 1-5 to create 5 additional columns of studs, with three studs in each column. When the width of the collar begins to narrow, begin making columns of two studs. Place them so the line up with the space on top and bottom of the middle stud from the column before it. 

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Step 7 — After you make your first row of two studs on one side of the collar, begin to work on the other side. This way, if you run out of studs, the front of your shirt is still ready to wear.Repeat steps 1-5 for this side, creating 6 columns of 3 studs, followed by one column of two studs.

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Step 8 — Once you have the fronts of both collar sides studded, it's time to start studding the back portion. Continue to make rows of two studs around the back of the collar, being careful to make sure that each column of studs lines up with the column before it. Also, it is best to do a few rows of on one side of the collar, and then do a few rows on the other side. This will help ensure that your lines will look continuous in the end.

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Step 9 — As your rows of studs begin to meet on the back of the collar, be careful to check your spacing. Here, you may find it helpful to place the remaining rows of studs at once, and then flip the collar over and secure them all at the same time. That way, you can make the final adjustments in your spacing and easily move the final studs, to prevent ending up with a row of studs that looks cramped (or getting a gap that looks like it should have another column). 

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Step 10 — When you're all done, button up your shirt, and admire!

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Gold Necklace — This doubles as a cute necklace for casual outfits!

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You'll need:
An awl
A small round plate
About a foot of gold chain
A lobster clasp and four jump rings
A small needle
Gold-colored thread
Metallic faux leather, which can be found at trimming stores or online.
A pencil
A paper file folder

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Step 1 — Place the plastic plate on the paper file folder. Trace around the plate with a pencil.

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Step 2 — From the "3 O'Clock" point on the circle, make a line about 2 1/2 inches long that slopes down at about a 45-degree angle.

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Step 3 — At the "6 O'Clock" point on the circle, draw a small, straight line pointing down, about 1/2 of an inch long.

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Step 4 — Connect the two lines from steps 2 and 3, making this line curve slightly.

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Step 5 — Cut out this shape you create in steps 2-4. This will be your collar template.

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Step 6 — On the back of the metallic faux-leather, trace around your template with the pencil. Flip the stencil over on the material, so this shape mirrors the one you just created, and trace.

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Step 7 — Cut out both collar pieces.

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Step 8 — Using the awl, poke a hole at the narrow end of the collar slightly away from the edge, being careful not to tare the material. Repeat for the other piece of the collar.

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Step 9 — Using the pliers, open a jump ring and thread it through one of the holes you created in step 8. Keep the jump ring open, and repeat this step for the other piece of the collar.

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Step 10 — Cut a 2, 4 1/2 inch section's of chain — you should be able to do this easily with a pair of scissors.

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Step 11 — Attach one end of one of the chain pieces you created in  step 10 onto one of the open jump rings. Close the jump ring, and attach the other piece of chain to the other collar piece.

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Step 12 — Using the pliers, open a jump ring and attach it to the end of one of the chains. Attach the lobster-claw clasp, and close the jump ring.

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Step 13 — Thread about 6 inches of gold thread onto your needle and tie a not. Take the two pieces of collar and slightly overlap the top points on the wider end, making sure the top lines up. Poke the needle through the overlapping area through the back, so your knot won't be visible once your collar is finished.

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Step 14 — Make a few more stitches on this overlapping area to secure the two pieces of collar together. Make the stitches as small as possible, so they aren't very noticeable.

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Step 15 — Flip the collar over and trim the thread, leaving about two inches of thread to tie with. Tie the two ends of the thread together into a double knot.

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Step 16 — Put your collar on as you would wear a necklace. Make sure that you clasp the necklace tight enough so that the top of the collar lines up with the top of your shirt. If you have a lot of excess chain, cut it off with the scissors.

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Cameo Collar — This collar may look like a ton of sewing, but it's actually extremely simple — you'll only need to make a few stitches, promise! 

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You'll need:
A brightly colored or patterned button-down. You'll be cutting the collar off, so either buy a new shirt to use for this project, find one for cheap at a thrift store, or use an old favorite shirt that's past its prime. We think this DIY would look awesome with a patterned shirt as well, so no need to run yourself ragged one looking for something orange.
An interesting button or brooch.
A needle
Thread
Scissors

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Step 1 — Unbutton the shirt, making it easier to remove the collar.

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Step 2 — Starting on one side of the shirt, begin to carefully cut the collar off, being very careful to cut just below the area where the collar is sewed on. This will keep the collar in tact, meaning you will have very little sewing to do.

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Step 3 — Once the collar is completely cut off from the shirt, trim any edges or lose threads that might still be left.

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Step 4 — Thread your needle with about 6-12 inches of thread, and secure the ends with a knot. Poke the needle through the collar from the back, about half an inch above the buttonhole that's already there.

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Step 5 — Thread the button or broach through the needle.

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Step 6 — Once the button is on the thread, poke the needle back through the collar slightly below the area where it first came up. This will help stabilize the button.

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Step 7 — Repeat steps 4-6 several more times, to ensure that the button is on securely. On the back of the collar, tie the two ends of the thread together in a knot, and trim any excess that reminds.

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Step 8 — Try your collar on. You should be able to fasten it using the button and buttonhole that was already on the collar. The decorative button you sewed on should be int he middle of collar.

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Western Tips — This might be our easiest DIY yet: You can get your own super-fancy, western-style shirt in just minutes (really!).

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You'll need:
A button down shirt with a collar. Feel free to chose any color or pattern you'd like.
Metal collar tips,  available at trim stores and online
A hammer

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Step 1 — Place one of the metal collar tops onto the end of one of the fabric collar points.

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Step 2 — Turn the collar over, making sure the metal tip stays in place. Gently begin to hammer the metal tip, so the points on the back flatten against the collar and hold the fabric in place.

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Step 3 — This is what the metal collar tip should look like after it's hammered on. You don't need to worry about the material going all the way to the bottom of the "V"  — you just want to make sure that the metal points are digging into the fabric enough so that the metal tip doesn't fall off.

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Step 4 — Repeat steps 1-3 for the other collar piece and the other collar tip.  Feel free to wear your favorite leather boots with this shirt, but we're going to suggest skipping the bolo tie (just saying'). 

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