Fight Frizz With These Genius Curly Hair DIYs

Does this sound like you: The temperature soars a single degree past 70 and your locks start to swell. And puff. And pouf. And suddenly, it feels like you're spending more time fighting the great fuzzy follicle war than actually enjoying your summer.
Straight, wavy, or curly, no coiff is buddy-buddy with frizz, and for good reason. That shiz straight up screws with your strands. Thankfully, there are ways to work with your natural texture to combat frizz and keep your cool in the summer heat. We asked Matt Fugate, a stylist at the Sally Hershberger Downtown salon in NYC, to show us how to create two hot hairstyles that actually work with the heat and humidity. Best of all, they’re beyond easy to do yourself — all you need are a few bobby pins, an elastic, and an out-of-control mane. Let’s get to it!
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Photographed by Winnie Au, Model Yasmin Daguilh
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Embellished Messy Bun

According to Fugate, frizz can actually help some hairstyles — it creates natural texture and volume and provides some grip to the hair, making it beneficial to creating interesting and elaborate-looking updos like this one.

His rule of thumb with frizz: Try not to overwork your hair. Work with what you've got and learn how to craft styles that look good with the texture, like waves and messy buns. Attempting to shellack your hair into submission is only going to result in failure and a whole lot of wasted time and effort. Instead, emphasize that unruliness in ways that make it look soft and romantic, and above all else, keep your hair well-hydrated! This will ensure that it stays soft and workable, rather than dry, staticky, and damaged.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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For this look you'll need two stretchy headbands. Slip these over your head before you start manipulating your hair, otherwise you'll be trying to pull them over your 'do and run the risk of messing it up.

Your hair should be clean, dry, and naturally textured. If you have straight hair, apply some volumizing mousse to your locks to add more hold, while wavy and curly girls should use curl-enhancing mousse for added definition.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Pull all of your hair up into a high ponytail and secure it with an elastic.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Grab the loose hair and begin manipulating it to create the shape you want. Get creative here — you can twist it into a chignon or roll it around into a messy bun.

Fugate says that no matter what shape you create, it's important to keep it high and tight on your head. This guarantees it gets your hair up off your back (keeping you cool) and creates a more formal appearance that emphasizes your neck and profile. "Don't do it too low or it will look messy," he says. "You want it to look like an actual style, not like your hair is falling down."

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Pin the hair with bobby pins once you get the desired look. Don't go overboard with pins though — you want it to be secure, but not to look like it was staple-gunned to your noggin.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Now, slip the two headbands up and over the front of your head, placing one toward the center of your head and one closer to the hairline, leaving a small gap in between them.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Place your hands on the front headband and push it down and back slightly, which will cause the hair to bunch up a bit between the two headbands.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Using an opened-up, thick barrette, gently "pick" up the hair from the root, pulling it away from the scalp to create a small puff of hair between the bands. This will give the front of the hair the softness it needs to match the back, and will make sure any flyaways won't look out of place as the day gets progressively hotter and more unbearable.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Seriously stunning and beyond easy, this fancy 'do keeps your hair off your face and still showcases the gorgeousness of your natural texture. The more hair you have, the more intricate you can get with the shape in the back — just be sure to have a few pins handy to keep it from melting!

Photographed by Winnie Au
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The Two-Way Braid

This pretty braid is a two-in-one 'do — we'll show you how to get two very different looks using the same steps. So crafty!

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Starting once again with clean dry hair, add in a serum or a cream to add shine and make manipulating the hair easier. This is especially important for girls with tight curls: "When you have textured hair, it's hard to just rake your fingers through your strands," says Fugate. "A cream makes it easier and prevents your hand from getting caught.

He used an amazing new product on Yasmin's hair from Shu Uemura Art of Hair that we unfortunately can't talk about quite yet. We can tell you that it gave her amazing shine and softness, and had a crazy-addictive scent. Seriously, we were trailing Yasmin around the office trying to catch a whiff of her perfumed locks.

Once hair is properly softened up with serum, use your fingers to create a deep side-part.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Hang your head over to the side and gather all of your hair on the opposite side of the part you just created. Fugate says it's easier to do a side braid if you just let gravity do most of the work for you — hanging your head to the side helps you gather and place your mane where you need it to be, which is particularly helpful if you have a LOT of hair, like Yasmin here.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Start a standard three-strand braid, making sure to pull it tight. Fugate says the braid should start at the nape of your neck on the opposite side of your head —the side where you created the side-part. More on that later.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Finish braiding your hair and secure with a small elastic.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Use your fingers to gently pull apart the braid, fattening it up and making it look a little rougher.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Voilà! An easy side braid that actually holds all of your hair. This is a great option for girls who want to stay cool, but still want to leave their hair somewhat down.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Now, if you'd rather just get those sticky strands up and off of your body, you can create a halo braid, a.k.a. a goddess braid. Simply grab the end of the braid and wrap it up and around your head. Keep the braid a few inches back from the hairline — it will end up looking a bit funky if it sits right along the edge of your forehead.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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Add pins to the braid as you wrap it, to hold it in place. This is where starting your braid from the opposite side really comes in handy: As you're wrapping the hair, your goal is have the ends come around until it meets the start of the braid to create that halo effect. By starting the braid at the opposite side of where it first hangs, you ensure it can actually meets its start point.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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"It's really important to embrace your texture with this one," says Fugate. "If some hair comes out — and most girls have layers, so that is bound to happen — embrace those flyaways. This is what gives you that Grecian feel rather than a standard milkmaid braid."

Who knew frizz could look this drop-dead gorgeous? Almost makes us thankful for the humidity. Almost.

Photographed by Winnie Au
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