"Six Months Into Our Relationship, I Was Diagnosed With Breast Cancer"

The first few months of a relationship are different for everyone, but generally involve figuring out how to be yourself around this new person, how much information to share, and how to get past the gross and embarrassing things your body will inevitably do. It can take months to fully trust and be open with your new partner.
However, the whole process was sped up for one woman, whose cancer diagnosis showed her exactly what kind of person her new boyfriend was — the kind who would stick with her through chemo and a double mastectomy.
She posted their story to The Way We Met on Instagram yesterday.
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"I was diagnosed with breast cancer on my and Danny's six month anniversary. I met Danny at a bar called Iggy's in New York City when a mutual friend introduced us. Come to find out, we grew up 20 minutes away from each other in New England. To break the ice, he showed me his Eagle Scout card and jokingly asked me if I was impressed. I was instantly attracted to his sense of humor. The first few months of our relationship were indescribable. We spent a lot of time together exploring the city, bar hopping on the Lower East Side, and staying up all hours of the night talking. Then six months into our relationship I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the young age of 23. I lost my mother to breast cancer when I was four years old, so it truly was a living nightmare. The day I was diagnosed I texted Danny, whose office was only a few blocks from the radiologists office, and asked him to come meet me. I told him something was very wrong. He found me completely shocked, standing on the sidewalk in the pouring rain. For the next six months, he was my rock. He was there during my double mastectomy surgery, multiple rounds of chemo, and doctors appointments. While everyone else was walking on eggshells around me, he continued to treat me exactly the same - always making me laugh with his sarcastic comments and jokes just as he had before I got sick. It really helped having that sense of normalcy in my life. Danny is so strong and has an amazing way of controlling his emotions, so when everyone else in my life was freaking out, he was not. He was such an amazing support to my family as well - making small talk with them in waiting rooms for hours when they were stressed out and upset. He even bought me a new pair of running shoes in my favorite color purple when I was cleared to work out again. Now every year on my date of diagnosis, we both take work off and spend the day together walking around NYC and doing things we love. It's one of my favorite days of the year despite the fact that it's connected to something that was so traumatic. When you survive cancer, you learn to celebrate every moment you have with the people you love."

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"I met Danny at a bar called Iggy's in New York City when a mutual friend introduced us," she wrote. "Come to find out, we grew up 20 minutes away from each other in New England. To break the ice, he showed me his Eagle Scout card and jokingly asked me if I was impressed. I was instantly attracted to his sense of humor." That same sense of humor got her through while going through treatment after her diagnosis.
"He was there during my double mastectomy surgery, multiple rounds of chemo, and doctors appointments. While everyone else was walking on eggshells around me, he continued to treat me exactly the same — always making me laugh with his sarcastic comments and jokes just as he had before I got sick. It really helped having that sense of normalcy in my life."
While her family, other friends, and everyone else in her life were (understandably) upset and worried, Danny was able to keep his cool. And that helped her keep hers. While they had only been together for a few months before she was diagnosed, Danny stepped up and helped his girlfriend and her family survive cancer.
Now, they spend the anniversary of her diagnosis together every year.
"We both take work off and spend the day together walking around NYC and doing things we love. It's one of my favorite days of the year despite the fact that it's connected to something that was so traumatic," she wrote. "When you survive cancer, you learn to celebrate every moment you have with the people you love."
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