Ashley Madison Teaches Men How NOT To Send Photos Of Their Junk

If you're a human with a phone or internet connection, there's a good chance you've either sent/received/thought about sending a naked photo to someone. While there's nothing wrong with sexting per se, there is something incredibly wrong with sending unsolicited and nonconsensual photos. I don't care how hot you think you are, or how harmless you think the photo is, sending someone a photo of your junk without consent is sexual harassment. No ifs, ands, or buts.
In a recent survey conducted by Match.com, 49% of women reported that they had received a dick pic. As Maxim writes: "49% of women means many, many dick pics. So. Many. Dick pics."
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Couldn't have said it better myself.
That number is shocking and frankly gross, but it's still much lower than data Ashley Madison just gathered from its members. The Canadian dating service, which proudly touts the motto "life is short; have an affair," surveyed its users and found that 73% of women have received unprompted nude pics,. Of those women, a whopping 71% said they don't opt to open their phones to an image of your penis, thank you very much.
In hopes of encouraging men to get their shit together, the notorious cheating site put together a guide on "things you should consider before you snap and send a phoner boner."
The first rule, they write, is to woo a woman through more old-fashioned tactics (i.e. telling her what your name is, asking her about herself, sharing your thoughts on literally anything besides how great you think your penis looks). Ashley Madison reminds men that pressing "send" on that crotch capture "signals you're desperate and probably text flashing a dozen other women with the same photos."
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Secondly, the site wants to remind men that "if she wants it, she'll ask." It's a simple, yet often disregarded point that everyone should tattoo on their minds, regardless of where they fall on the gender spectrum.
The third rule is to really put your heart into it if someone actually does ask for a photo. "Don't be lazy and undermine the opportunity," Ashley Madison's statement read. "Take the time to trim the shrubs so you can see the branch and pick appropriate angles and lighting to do your favorite appendage justice."
Finally, the service advises users not to "assume it's tit for tat," reminding everyone that "sending nude selfies is a personal choice."
Though women everywhere have been saying all of the above for years, if it takes Ashley Madison to get it through men's heads, so be it.
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