Prepare Your Wallets: Amazon Introduces Prime For Clothes

You may never have to enter a mall again, thanks to Amazon's new online retail service, Prime Wardrobe.
The recently announced program gives Prime members the option to try on outfits before they pony up the cash — much like you can do in a brick-and-mortar shop — all from the comfort of their own homes. But how does it work?
According to The New York Times, Prime Wardrobe will give customers the option to try on three to 15 pieces of clothing at no cost. Once shoppers have given the items a whirl, they simply hold onto the things they want and send back the items they don't within seven days in a box Amazon provides — and yes, the retail giant even covers the shipping cost by providing a prepaid shipping label. In the end, Prime users only pay for the clothes they decide to keep.
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As an incentive, Amazon promises to provide steeper savings — up to 20% off — to customers who keep more items.
You can watch Amazon's Prime Wardrobe ad below.
Though The Times says Amazon hasn't declared a starting date for the service, people have already started sharing their mixed reactions on Twitter.
Some are celebrating the news with memes and gifs, while others have shared how excited they are by the prospect of having more time back to dedicate to other things, like raising a family.
Other Twitter users have voiced their concerns about Amazon's politics, both for advertising on right-wing sites and for its impact on the environment.
Though we can't say for sure, we suspect that we'll see an uptick in fast fashion consumption, much to Vivienne Westwood's dismay.
The concept behind Prime Wardrobe isn't a new one. For years, companies like Warby Parker and Stitch Fix have given consumers the option to try on their products at home before buying.
While there's no definitive projection for how Prime Wardrobe will affect both online retailers and storefronts, The Times reports that analysts predict that "Amazon will become the largest apparel retailer in the United States" by the end of the year.
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