What We Wore To The Women's March On Washington

Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Today's Women's March on Washington was one of the largest demonstrations in American history (and we're not even counting all the people who attended the sister marches in other cities all over the world). The sheer size of the march makes sense when you consider that its main mission — to promote and defend women's rights — speaks to America's single largest "minority" group. Women make up 51% of the American population, and a large part of the fight means showing those in power that this constituency and its needs will be impossible to ignore. It makes sense, then, that we dressed to be seen.
We wore pantsuits and Pussyhats and clear backpacks and puffer coats. We wore saris and hijabs and wigs and weaves. Some of us wore what we wear every day, and some of us wore our nicest things out, but all of us came with the intention to be recognized for our womanhood. The people who attended represent the wide cross-section of the myriad backgrounds, cultures, and ideologies, and the things we picked to wear showcase that variety.
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Ahead, we're showing the women who joined us (and you! and her!) at the march today, and the outfits they chose for it.
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Raquel Willis
“I wanted to wear something that was unabashedly feminine, but also powerful. Something that shows that I'm okay being cute, but I will still kick your ass.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Lindsay Arakawa
"I put this outfit together last night asking myself 'girl, what do you feel the most badass in?' I'm wearing a graphic tee (this one is an Alpha Female tee from @SparkleDiva69), high-waisted pants, a cute hat — I'm ready to do it to it."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
"Overall I felt that it was so important for me to show up as an Asian-American today. Growing up, the media and (some) people like to remind you that you're stereotyped as a "quiet and docile Asian woman" (who would never speak their mind), so it feels good to show up and let people know that I'm not quiet and that I will stand up for and support the things I believe in."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Jeni Tanner Jordan
"A friend of mine who is the head escort at one of the independent abortion clinics in Montgomery, Alabama made these earrings. She couldn’t be here, and she wanted me to wear them for her. And my pussy hat; no march is complete without it. My friend made it for me, too — she couldn’t make the trip, either, so that was her way to contribute and be a part of it. I'm a secular feminist who's disabled in the South. I feel like if people see me, and they see I’m outspoken, they might think they don’t have to be ashamed or afraid.
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
“I'm the legislative liaison for The Greater Birmingham National Organization for Women; I served as president the two previous years. Trump got elected, and our first meeting after was full of people who wanted to make a difference, who were ready to take action now, and I think that’s what's important. This is the first time since Trump won the electoral college that I have felt hope. Coming here and seeing all these pink pussy hats — I know we’re all going to go back and take action and things are going to start changing, because we see right now just how terrible it is.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Annie Rose
“Oh, this old thing? This was painted on me lovingly by my friend. It says, My fierce, powerful body. My choice.’ I just feel really passionate about not struggling for simply hanging out. We’re fighting for more than just equality. We’re fighting for liberation for all people. I feel beautiful, magical, and strong."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Aurora James
“I’ve had this sweater for a long time, and it says ‘Panther Power’ on it. What I’m wearing actually was my last thought! I’m here because I think it’s so important that we all get out and stand up for what we believe in. We’ve been a little bit of a passive society, and I think we need to actually motivate ourselves to go and support what needs supporting.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
"I designed my purse — it’s Brother Vellies. I think it’s important to carry and wear things I felt my most comfortable in."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Aurora Linnea and Crystal Dyer
"We're in mourning clothing."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Aurora Linnea
"I really want to be in solidarity with women in this moment. I feel like there are so many threats to all people with this administration, but the threats to women in particular are very real and very harrowing. And I just want to be women right now and feel good about it."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Crystal Dyer
“I’m really inspired by older feminists. I wanted my veil to reference nuns and sisters — my hat is Masonic. On so many levels I'm upset by Trump’s presidency. Like, racially, even economically — I’m pretty much against him in every way.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Betsy Fiory-McCoy
“I'm wearing pink because we think Trump needs to understand that a ‘pussy’ is only intended to be a small cat or a term of love between people who like each other. It's not something to be grabbed on women he's never met before.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Paloma Elsesser
“I wanted to look like I’m a SWAT, because I’m here to fight. I’m ready and braced for that.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Marion Zaniello
“I have a business named Marz Denim, and I make painted jeans. This is a Martin Luther King, Jr. quote on front: ‘Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.’ The back has a Rupi Kaur quote, who’s a more contemporary female poet. It says, ‘We all move forward when we recognize how resilient and striking the women around us are.’”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Tenzin
“These are the robes of the Buddha that we wear in our particular tradition. They help us uphold our vows, keep us strong in terms of our being committed to social justice. Our practice is for the benefit of all beings. That includes women, doesn’t it?”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Adama Sow
"I’m from Dakar, Senegal, and I’m American. I got these overalls from a vintage store in Amsterdam, and everything else was my mom’s."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
"I’m here because I couldn’t not be here. Everything else just didn’t feel like it was worth my energy. This is where I want to be, and this is where I need to be.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Amy Hood
“We wanted to represent red, white, blue, and pink — so this femme-patriotic. This is how we dress every day. Everyone thinks we're wearing a costume, but this is what we wear.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Pussyhat Project caps in action.
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Rachael Wang
“I'm wearing a lot of vintage today, but I had to wear a beret just to throw it back and pay homage to all the movements that have come before us. I’ve got a really good Marilyn Minter button on my beret. It says, ‘Don’t fuck with us, don’t fuck without us.’”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Siobhan Buckley and Jadyn Kist
“We went to the mall yesterday and we wanted to get anything pink there was. It’s a feminist color. We had talked to Code Pink before, and then I was working for The Feminist Majority Foundation, and both use pink.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Nora Mahmoud
“I'm wearing purple for the suffragettes, because that’s the color that they used to wear. And I'm wearing a leather jacket because they're badass. My purple hijab says freedom and power to me — freedom to determine how others see me, and how I move through the world. We’re here to march and to support everyone who is oppressed and who don’t feel safe, because everyone deserves to feel safe in this country.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Halle Bryant
“I'm wearing this shirt, which I got from my grandma. I'm Native, and it says, ‘Homeland Security, Fighting Against Terrorism since 1492.’ And it has a picture of a bunch of renowned chiefs.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Jessica
“I wanted something with red, white, and blue. And then, my Black Flag shirt for reasons that are obvious. This hat is a Beyoncé lyric. I wanted to be protected — to be warm, safe from pepper spray, and ready to fight. Yeah — fuck this. There are so many reasons to be here.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Susanna
“Donald Trump tries to fight Muslims, and Mexicans, people of all colors and religions. I’m here to support each person that comes here for this rally. The sign says ‘No racism, no hate. Yes for love and peace’ to show that that’s our religion and Islam is peace.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Harriet Sokmensuer
“All my clothes are secondhand, so it's just kind of roll with the punches. I usually stick with black, because it’s easy — and that’s pretty empowering. This is my most comfortable, badass outfit — it’s vintage Levi’s, my oldest Vans, a comfortable leather jacket, and this little clutch.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
"My back patch is made from a pillowcase."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Danielle Jackson
“This is very warm — I can layer it up.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
"The coat has deep pockets, and I have a fanny pack. You want to be hands-free out here! You want to be able to shout and cheer."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Collette Williams
“My hair shrinks in this kind of weather, so I decided to just tie it. Also, too, I grabbed it should it get risky, and they start firing off the smoky stuff. It's good to have something to cover your face. It’s [my daughter’s] generation, and her children, if they come after. We hope that this is something they won’t have to do. But if they have to, their mother’s prepared.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Ketchell
“I don’t own pants, and I thought it’d be cold!
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Val Norman
“We gotta make it known that the Blackness and your natural heritage is a beautiful thing, instead of just only white things being beautiful.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Alicia Smith
“I think I feel like my most true self. My hair wrap is activism. I’m trying to brush off stereotypes and what people expect me to be.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Julia Arnsten
“Doctors tend to be listened to, and we have a lot of things to say. We want to take care of everybody — health care is a human right. We believe in the Affordable Care Act.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Dawn Goldworm
“These jackets came partly embellished, and then we added it onto it. We wanted to do a sort of revolutionary military thing, but soften it with love and happiness.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Dawn Goldworm and Katrina Blandino
“We're matching on purpose! We're best friends. I think, in a way, all the women here match. They're trying to divide us, and we have to come together, because we’re all the same.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Nadya Rockefeller
"We wanted to honor all the famous suffrage acts."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Karin Tanabe
“We both attended Vassar College, and Vassar has a history of supporting women's rights. We wanted to honor that.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Cora Cofield
“I've been wearing this shirt at work a lot, because I feel like I’m surrounded by a lot of men. It makes a statement all day long. In my opinion, this is assertiveness — I take a stand.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
"I'm an electrician, so I wear pants all the time. So on Saturdays, I wear a dress."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Zarah Soria, Brittany Carmon, Alicia Castro, and Hazel Diaz
“We weren’t originally dressed like this, and then we saw a vendor with Black Lives Matter hoodies that had the names of all the victims. We were like ‘That is dope, and we need to wear that.’”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Hazel Diaz
“We wanted to make sure women of color were represented here in the march today. Our sign says ‘Not Whores, Not Saints, Just Women,’ in Spanish. My 11- and 9-year-old made this for us. We want to make sure that people understand that women aren't here to battle each other and compete with each other to the top. Empowering each other is like essential. Like, we do that in our friendships and our relationships with each other, and we show that to our children and our family members, and in our community. We definitely wanted to make sure that there was something that represented the work that we all do together."
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Christine
“My clothes don’t symbolize anything. I just wanted to be comfortable. I’m protesting Trump. He's a menace. When George Bush was elected, we didn’t like it, but we didn’t take to the streets like this. This is trouble. People don’t realize it. He's duped a lot of people.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Solange Franklin Reed
“Turtlenecks reference Black Panthers. I'm here for intersectional feminism, environmental justice, to be an ally for non-heteronormative and non-racist, and non-homophobic values.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Rachel Manning
“They were giving out Bing Bang pins, so I put them on my hat. I also got a bunch of pins from my grandmother and my mother that I wanted to wear.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
“I also wore all pink, because obviously.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Irisa, Patty Patton, Marie Antoinette, Samy, Kareema, Lorenzo

Kareema:
“Pink represents women, and is synonymous with women. We just wanted something that spoke to power, unity, and something that would represent a collective whole — so we wore berets. The black leather jackets are just a necessity, because it’s cold! We match because that’s strength. We’re all family and we wanted to unite for this cause.”
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Photographed by Michelle Groskopf
Samy
“I trained my kids to be activists since they were knee-high. My first protest was in New York. I was a transit advocate. I was called ‘The Mad Lady of the A Train.’”
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